World Wide Web + Number

Discussion in 'Computing' started by Dean, Jan 23, 2005.

  1. Dean

    Dean Guest

    Sorry of this has been discussed, debated and despatched but over the past
    few days I've noticed some websites now have an address which use a digit
    after 'www'. For example, Jaycar Electronics now uses www1.jaycar.com.au. Is
    this just a way of extending the number of possible web addresses ? Or is it
    proof that man never really went to the moon ?

    Dean
     
    Dean, Jan 23, 2005
    #1
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  2. Dean

    Fred Ferd Guest


    Well they dont use it as their front entrance.



    www.jaycar.com.au points to one IP addresss

    What do they do when they want to have a web server on a different address
    ?
    Well they could use thisisthe2ndwebserver.jaycar.com.au

    AS long as you use http://, or use it in a context where http is assumed (eg
    in web browsers), then
    it works as http.

    In fact, the use of the "www" is just a common convention and not a rule.
    Also ftp servers dont have to be ftp.domain.tld , they can be
    'thiscomputersucks.jaycar.com.au' or any such.
     
    Fred Ferd, Jan 23, 2005
    #2
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  3. Dean

    Dean Guest

    "Fred Ferd" >
    Interesting Fred. I seem to remember using a few websites where they didn't
    bother with 'www' now that you mention it.

    Thanks,
    Dean.
     
    Dean, Jan 23, 2005
    #3
  4. Dean

    Fred Ferd Guest


    that too.

    eg jaycar.com.au might point at their website.


    the www is just a reminder that its going to be a http protocol.

    But thats redundant.

    If you wanted to leach from someone's ftp server, wouldnt you just type
    ftp://someone.tld ?? why bother with ftp://ftp.someone.tld , where theres
    repeated information...
     
    Fred Ferd, Jan 23, 2005
    #4
  5. Aussie Bomber, Jan 24, 2005
    #5
  6. Its just a subdomain, nothing special. It is www by convention.
    You could use www, www-1, www-12, wxyz-123, or anything else for that
    matter.

    See http://www.webopedia.com/TERM/S/subdomain.html

    gtoomey
     
    Gregory Toomey, Jan 24, 2005
    #6
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