Very, very cheap NAS?

Discussion in 'DIY Computers' started by GB, Feb 15, 2011.

  1. GB

    GB Guest

    GB, Feb 15, 2011
    #1
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  2. GB

    Species8472 Guest

    Yep. (I'm using them as network interfaces for intelligent sensor boxes
    based on arduinos.. I can't buy or make ethernet shields for that price :) )

    You will find several articles about hacking them eg
    http://emprex-nas.blogspot.com/

    At least one drive needs to be formatted in XFS (all drives unless you
    hack it).

    I can't really comment on them as NAS boxes, as, to me, NAS boxes need
    speed and redundancy and these have neither. YMMV.

    If you want a basic box for some reason, I guess that they would do.

    Ebuyer also does a different "media" box, which takes a SATA/IDE hard
    drive, for not a lot more and that may be a better bet...

    http://www.ebuyer.com/product/247811 @19.98

    I have several of these too -also hacked extensively - mostly with
    extra holes drilled in, as the drive runs hot otherwise...
     
    Species8472, Feb 15, 2011
    #2
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  3. GB

    Another Dave Guest

    It's now (1650 Wed 16th Feb) out of stock.

    Another Dave
     
    Another Dave, Feb 16, 2011
    #3
  4. GB

    Species8472 Guest

    I still think that the ME1 is better value - the IDE<>SATA converter
    must be worth a couple of quidlets, to start with.
     
    Species8472, Feb 16, 2011
    #4
  5. GB

    GB Guest

    I think the other one (the one I posted) may still be available in the BT
    shop, but I agree with you that something that has a native HDD interface is
    better.
     
    GB, Feb 17, 2011
    #5
  6. GB

    GB Guest

    Oh, and I suspect that compared to a freenas device made out of an old PC,
    these will pay for themselves in a couple of years in saved electricity.
     
    GB, Feb 17, 2011
    #6
  7. GB

    newshound Guest

    I'm confused, doesn't the ME1 need an IDE drive?
     
    newshound, Feb 17, 2011
    #7
  8. GB

    Species8472 Guest

    The more recently released version comes with an IDE<>SATA adapter that
    can be put between a SATA drive and the internal PATA cable, when a SATA
    drive is used.

    Note that there are size limitations for the drive that can be fitted -
    there is a webpage listing drives known to work - sorry, I don't have it
    to hand at the moment.

    There can also be temperature problems, as the fitted fan is pathetic.
    So you need to use a low consumption drive*.

    * Or add additional ventilation holes. As I was expecting to to this to
    more than one, I programmed my NC mill to drill the holes and add a
    groove for an electroluminescent wire... Boys' toys - I know :)
     
    Species8472, Feb 17, 2011
    #8
  9. GB

    newshound Guest

    Thanks, I think I need one! Confusingly, one of the sites says they support
    1TB
     
    newshound, Feb 18, 2011
    #9
  10. GB

    GB Guest

    I have to admit to having a deprived existence, NC mill-wise.
     
    GB, Feb 18, 2011
    #10
  11. GB

    Hugh Newbury Guest

    Hugh Newbury, Feb 18, 2011
    #11
  12. GB

    Rob Morley Guest

    Similar much cheaper on eBay, but it's USB anyway, not networked.
     
    Rob Morley, Feb 18, 2011
    #12
  13. GB

    rich Guest

    Thought you might like a result on this

    Saw your post, for 12 quid total, its got to be worth a punt.

    Missed the postie on Monday, got it yesterday. Have it up running after a
    bit of fiddling.

    Have it connected to a netgear wireless router & using an old 80GB drive
    in an enclosure as storage.

    Generally I use linux, PCLOS2010 KDE at the moment. The setup tool runs
    under wine but to format the drive had to connect it to a windows machine.

    So far, a simple setup, use FTP to move files around and firefox to view/
    listen movie/audio files. Laptop (PCLOS E17 / windows) wireless connects
    fine via the router.

    Maybe not for the experts but possibly ok for a small home system. How
    long it will last is another question, my usb enclosure could do with a
    fan.
     
    rich, Feb 23, 2011
    #13
  14. GB

    Tony Guest

    Have you replaced the firmware with a Debian kernel (which I think is what
    http://tinyhack.com/agestar/debian-noserialneeded.html that does), or
    something else entirely?
    --
    Tony Evans
    Saving trees and wasting electrons since 1993
    blog -> http://perceptionistruth.com/
    books -> http://www.bookthing.co.uk/
    [ anything below this line wasn't written by me ]
     
    Tony, Feb 26, 2011
    #14
  15. GB

    Species8472 Guest


    I'm trying out "something else entirely", at the moment - but, at the
    moment, what I am trying to do isn't working :(

    Still, I've always believed that you can learn a lot more from something
    that isn't working than you can from something that is :)..
     
    Species8472, Feb 26, 2011
    #15
  16. And it's already broken, so further breakage doesn't matter. :eek:)
     
    Mike Tomlinson, Feb 27, 2011
    #16
  17. GB

    Rob Morley Guest

    But what's /really/ annoying is when you actually manage to fix it, and
    just as you're tidying up you kill it irretrievably.
     
    Rob Morley, Feb 27, 2011
    #17
  18. BTDTGTTS. Too often. :eek:(

    But you live and learn.
     
    Mike Tomlinson, Feb 27, 2011
    #18
  19. GB

    Species8472 Guest


    Of course, if you have a suitable flash programmer, you can whip the
    chip off the board and dump the contents into the programmer. Farnell
    will sell you a blank flash chip for three quid or thereabouts (once
    they are back in stock). It only has pins running up two edges, so
    removing and replacing it shouldn't be too big a problem - as long as
    you don't make a habit of it.

    IIUC, It does have the serial port pins (albeit at three volts, so you
    will need a voltage converter, such as a Max). So you should be able to
    unbrick it.

    I'm trying to get it to work with an Arduino emulating a USB device to
    provide a bi-directional data link between some sensors and a driver on
    a PC....
     
    Species8472, Feb 27, 2011
    #19
  20. Ah, an Arduino. One of our programmers at work has been playing with
    one to see if it could be a viable replacement for a PLC. It seems to
    be a halfway house between a microcontroller and a PC104-style PC.

    From a hardware geek's point of view, I thought it looked well-made,
    though it's a pain trying to house things like that neatly.

    Have you looked at the Beagleboard? beagleboard.org
     
    Mike Tomlinson, Feb 27, 2011
    #20
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