Three Desktops side by side and MS wireless keyboards/mice problems

Discussion in 'PC Hardware' started by No Way, Mar 3, 2007.

  1. No Way

    No Way Guest

    I have three desktops placed side by side and all are using MS'
    wireless keyboards and mice. The two are using MS Wireless Comfort
    Keyboard 1.0A (Model: 1027) with MS Wireless Laser Mouse 6000
    (Model:1052) and one is using MS Wireless Multimedia Keyboard 1.0A
    (Model:WUR0446).

    The problem is that whenever two computers are being used, one
    keyboard/mouse set will be lagging or be non responsive for a few
    seconds.

    When all three are being used, it's usually two kb/mouse sets that
    display the same problem.

    We make sure to reset the connect by using the connect buttons on both
    the kb and the mouse, but doesn't help at all. Anybody have any
    suggestions or tips in preventing this type of problem from happening?
    Thanks.
     
    No Way, Mar 3, 2007
    #1
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  2. No Way

    Paul Guest

    There are some details on Bluetooth here. I don't know what standards
    your current gear adheres to, but an environment full of wireless
    devices is more challenging. For example, you're probably using
    wireless networking at 2.4GHz as well as the input devices. Which
    is fine, if the Bluetooth devices avoid the frequencies they see
    interference. Apparently Bluetooth 1.2 or later, has adaptive
    frequency hopping.

    http://www.microsoft.com/hardware/mouseandkeyboard/features/bluetooth.mspx
    http://download.microsoft.com/downl...9ea4/MicrosoftHardwareBluetoothWhitePaper.pdf

    Bluetooth standards versions are discussed here:

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bluetooth#Specifications_and_Features

    Placing two of the setups in Faraday Cages, will solve the problem :)
    These are a favorite of physics students. Some used to do their
    homework in these, every night. They make these in versions larger
    than this, big enough for a card table and chair. This one is just
    pint sized.

    http://demo.physics.uiuc.edu/lectdemo/scripts/demo_descript.idc?DemoID=169

    Paul
     
    Paul, Mar 4, 2007
    #2
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