NOKIA CEO'S LETTER TO EMPLOYEES

Discussion in 'iPhone' started by Dr. Jai Maharaj, Feb 11, 2011.

  1. Dr. Jai Maharaj

    Wes Groleau Guest

    Every time¹ I’ve moved a PowerPoint file from one O.S. to another,
    margins screwed up, bullets appeared or disappeared, line heights
    went ape, fonts that had similar names weren't similar, etc.

    I don't put movies in PowerPoint, and minimal graphics.

    ¹Admittedly not many. I use PowerPoint when _required_ to.

    I have never had to make a presentation where PowerPoint
    (or anything similar) could have added any value whatsoever.
     
    Wes Groleau, Feb 14, 2011
    #41
    1. Advertisements

  2. When I took a public speaking course about six or seven years ago, we had
    to use a powerpoint visual aid in at least one of our major speeches. I
    created my presentation in Keynote 1, and saved it to a CD formatted for
    Powerpoint. I had no problem playing it on the school's Windows computer.
     
    Michelle Steiner, Feb 14, 2011
    #42
    1. Advertisements

  3. Dr. Jai Maharaj

    Your Name Guest

    Whatever you want to believe. :-\
     
    Your Name, Feb 14, 2011
    #43
  4. Dr. Jai Maharaj

    Your Name Guest

    Margins??? PowerPoint doesn't have margins - it's for on-screen
    presentations, although many people do actually use it as desktop publishing
    software because Word is so horribly bad at doing that.


    Nope, never had this problem.

    This can happen, but it's rarely a big deal. It also happens with any file
    transfer, so isn't really a PowerPoint problem. Word documents also get
    screwed up by the same problems, as do FileMaker Pro databases.

    Word actually tries hard to make documents look the same, but as soon as you
    click in the document all hell can break loose with stuff shifting around to
    fit as the differences in the fonts, page set-up, etc. all kick in.

    Depends what you are presenting, what other media / aids you have available,
    size of the audience, etc.

    There was one lecturerer I had at university who was so utterly hopeless
    that ALL he did was read from the textbook ... the textbook he wrote. You
    could buy the textbook and skip all the lectures, as some people actually
    did.
     
    Your Name, Feb 14, 2011
    #44
  5. Dr. Jai Maharaj

    Your Name Guest

    It greatly depends on how comlex you PowerPoint / Keynote presentation is. A
    few simple static slides will have little or no problems. Once you start
    trying to use PowerPoints "features" things can get messy ... and if you use
    features of Keynote not available in PowerPoint, things can get even
    messier.
     
    Your Name, Feb 14, 2011
    #45
  6. Whatever you want to believe. :-\[/QUOTE]

    I believe things that are factual and/or logical.
     
    Michelle Steiner, Feb 14, 2011
    #46
  7. It greatly depends on how comlex you PowerPoint / Keynote presentation
    is. A few simple static slides will have little or no problems. Once you
    start trying to use PowerPoints "features" things can get messy ... and
    if you use features of Keynote not available in PowerPoint, things can
    get even messier.[/QUOTE]

    Well, if one plays back the saved file to see how the translation went, one
    can then make any necessary modifications, if any are needed. It really is
    that simple.
     
    Michelle Steiner, Feb 14, 2011
    #47
  8. Dr. Jai Maharaj

    Salgud Guest

    No question that PPt is cumbersome and bloated. It's made by M$, isn't it?
    But it is hardly useless, if you know how to use it. That means you don't
    use it to display user notes for the audience to follow along while you
    talk and talk and talk. That's how 99.9% of PPt users apply it. Admittedly,
    awful.

    I've seen a number of PPt presentations that blew my socks off. The most
    memorable one was a scientist explaining why a "one-size-fits-all" approach
    to dealing with HIV/AIDS in Africa won't work. He showed dynamic Excel
    graphs of the various trends of HIV/AIDS in African countries. I don't
    remember all the details, but each country had a color-coded dot on the
    graph whose relative size represented the extent of the HIV/AIDS problem in
    the country, and the dots changed size and moved around on the graph to
    represent the passage of time. So he was showing the changing situation in
    Africa in reference to four varibles simultaneously, and it was totally
    understandable! It was amazing, and certainly opened my eyes to the real
    potential of PPt. The PPt was there to show graphically what he was saying,
    and it worked perfectly.

    I've also seen "Rules for properly Using PPt" various places online. The
    don'ts are more important than the Dos.

    Don't make PPt slides that are speaker notes.
    Don't use the canned formats that come with the sofware. (You have to start
    from scratch using a format that suits your topic)
    Avoid bullets/bulleted lists
    Use minimal text, just enough to explain the graphic that gives the
    necessary information. PPt should be used to show some sort of graphical
    evidence to support/substantiate your point.

    Admittedly, this is far more difficult to do, especially at first, than the
    conventional speaker notes approach to using PPt, which is why it's so
    seldom used properly.

    Used this way, PPt is a very useful, powerful way to enhance a
    presentation, even as cumbersome and bloated as it is.
     
    Salgud, Feb 14, 2011
    #48
  9. Dr. Jai Maharaj

    Your Name Guest

    I believe things that are factual and/or logical.[/QUOTE]

    Nope, you wanted to try and prove how "clever" (just like certain other
    tolling fools around here) you are by bringing up the irrelevance of "retail
    boxes" that nobody else had mentioned. Then don't believe the real facts
    when told you're wrong because retail boxes do exist in the real world
    (rather then the fantasy "world" of America).
     
    Your Name, Feb 14, 2011
    #49
  10. Dr. Jai Maharaj

    Your Name Guest

    Well, if one plays back the saved file to see how the translation went, one
    can then make any necessary modifications, if any are needed. It really is
    that simple.[/QUOTE]

    And so you may as well have used PowerPoint in the first place to not have
    to do those extra tweaks. As I said in the first place: if you want full
    compatibility, you have to use Microsoft Office ... there is NO other
    product that is fully compatible.
     
    Your Name, Feb 14, 2011
    #50
  11. Dr. Jai Maharaj

    Wes Groleau Guest

    It certainly does. It has text boxes, and when working on text in
    such a box, you can view a "ruler" similar to the one in work, with
    right and left margins, first row indent, tab markers, etc. "Similar"
    as in appearance, because it does not _behave_ like the one in Word.
    I've never had that happen taking Word docs from Mac to Win
    or vice versa. In spite of the fact that I (unlike most)
    actually USE Word's formatting features.


    --
    Wes Groleau

    There ain't no right wing,
    there ain't no left wing.
    There's only you and me and we just disagree.
    (apologies to Jim Krueger)
     
    Wes Groleau, Feb 14, 2011
    #51
  12. office.


    If only! ;)

    There are now six (or seven depending on your POV)- in addition to the
    two you listed, there is also "Professional," "Professional Academic,"
    "Professional Plus," and "Standard."[/QUOTE]

    We're discussing the Mac versions, not the Windows versions.
     
    Michelle Steiner, Feb 14, 2011
    #52
  13. And so you may as well have used PowerPoint in the first place to not
    have to do those extra tweaks.[/QUOTE]

    Not for the price differences, it's not worth it.
    If it gets the job done, full compatibility isn't an requirement.
     
    Michelle Steiner, Feb 14, 2011
    #53
  14. In a word, "bullshit". We were discussing retail sales of the product.

    And you can shove your anti-America bigotry up your ass.
     
    Michelle Steiner, Feb 14, 2011
    #54
  15. Dr. Jai Maharaj

    Your Name Guest

    Ah, that where you confused me. Text boxes don't have "margins", they have
    "indents". Pages have margins (there may be margin settings with the
    hadnout printouts in PowerPoint, but I've never even looed at those). :)


    I can't say I've noticed any difference ... they're as appallingly bad and
    annoying in PowerPoint as they are in Word.



    It happens not only with Mac <-> Windows, but also Mac <-> Mac and Windows
    <-> Windows ... partly it's due to an inconsistency / non-standardisation
    in printer driver software. :-(
     
    Your Name, Feb 15, 2011
    #55
  16. Dr. Jai Maharaj

    Your Name Guest

    Not for the price differences, it's not worth it.
    If it gets the job done, full compatibility isn't an requirement.[/QUOTE]

    Except that as I said in the first place: If you WANT full compatibilty,
    you HAVE to use Microsoft Office ... there is NO other product that is
    FULLY compatible.

    As I also said in the first place, if you're pretty much self-contained,
    then you can use something else like iWork or one of the free / cheaper
    Office clones.

    :-\
     
    Your Name, Feb 15, 2011
    #56
  17. Dr. Jai Maharaj

    Your Name Guest

    No, I gave and we were discussing the prices and variations of Microsoft
    Office for the Mac (and Microsoft software in general) ... nobody even
    mentioned what was or wasn't "off the shelf" or "retail sales" until you
    piped in trying to prove how "clever" you are.
     
    Your Name, Feb 15, 2011
    #57
  18. Except that as I said in the first place: If you WANT full compatibilty,
    you HAVE to use Microsoft Office ... there is NO other product that is
    FULLY compatible.[/QUOTE]

    Is there anything that Powerpoint can do that Keynote can't do?
     
    Michelle Steiner, Feb 15, 2011
    #58
  19. Dr. Jai Maharaj

    Wes Groleau Guest

    Word calls the space outside of the actual text the margin.

    I (a former technical writer) use the same terminology.

    The dictionaries that come up with
    <http://www.google.com/search?q=define:margin>
    define it the same way.

    If PowerPoint wants to call it something different,
    that's just one more objection I have against it.
     
    Wes Groleau, Feb 15, 2011
    #59
  20. Dr. Jai Maharaj

    Your Name Guest

    Powerpoint doesn't call them anything different - the indicators on the
    text rulers have always been "indents".

    "Margins" are only the gap around the edge of the page, usually set via
    Page Setup window or the Format Document window ... the problem is that
    Word, also lets you change the margins (and column "gutters") by dragging
    extra controls on the text ruler.
     
    Your Name, Feb 15, 2011
    #60
    1. Advertisements

Ask a Question

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

You'll need to choose a username for the site, which only take a couple of moments (here). After that, you can post your question and our members will help you out.