New ASUS motherboard info

Discussion in 'PC Hardware' started by Motor T, Nov 21, 2014.

  1. Motor T

    Motor T Guest

    I see an ASUS Z97-E motherboard on Newegg I would like to get. I can't
    find any reviews for this board anywhere. Nor can I find a QVI list of
    qualified memory. Is this a new board, or is it older/unreliable? Any
    help would be appreciated as it quite inexpensive compared to other Z97
    boards. Thanks.
     
    Motor T, Nov 21, 2014
    #1
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  2. Motor T

    Al Drake Guest

    I just looked on Google and found countless reviews.
     
    Al Drake, Nov 21, 2014
    #2
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  3. Motor T

    Motor T Guest

    For a Z97-E? (note the 'E'). All I get is the Newegg results and there
    are NO reviews for this board.
     
    Motor T, Nov 21, 2014
    #3
  4. Motor T

    Paul Guest

    Launched Oct.19, by the looks of the announcement over here. Allow one month
    for 40 foot shipping container to travel from China/Taiwan, makes first product
    available Nov.19 (roughly). That could account for the lack of reviews. You would
    think though, that people in other parts of the world would have sampled the
    board by now, and posted to the Asus forum about it. Usually a few posters get
    to the forum, before the North Americans do.

    http://vip.asus.com/forum/topic.aspx?board_id=1&model=Z97-E&SLanguage=en-us

    Paul
     
    Paul, Nov 22, 2014
    #4
  5. There are no reviews on any of the sites that sell this board, and
    most of them have it on sale. If you want it that bad, buy it and be
    the first to review it. (now I wonder why it would be on sale nearly
    everywhere?)
     
    Charlie Hoffpauir, Nov 22, 2014
    #5
  6. Motor T

    John Doe Guest

    Boldly go where no man has gone before!
     
    John Doe, Nov 22, 2014
    #6
  7. Motor T

    Al Drake Guest

    The best place visit is a motherboard forum. Preferably the ASUS user
    forum. I have a Gigabyte Z97X-UD5H which I paid about the same as the
    ASUS you're looking at. ASUS and Gigabyte are at the top of the list so
    the only way you could have any regrets is if one didn't have as many
    features as another. I originally returned my first selection
    GA-Z97X-UD3H($125) because it had less USB ports or something. I forget
    now. No cost to send it back. Sometimes saving a few bucks is not always
    my first priority. The long you wait for something the lower the price
    drops most of the time. In the case of a good motherboard and the CPU I
    bought(Intel Core i7-4790K Haswell Quad-Core 4.0GHz LGA 1150) the price
    hasn't gone down significantly. A sign of good quality I think.

    You could visit the ASUS forum and ask the difference between the 'E'
    and the 'A' which might help you decide.
     
    Al Drake, Nov 22, 2014
    #7
  8. Motor T

    Motor T Guest

    Thanks for the replies and the link. I decided to 'go for it', based on
    reputation and price. It is very much equal to the Z97-A I was going to
    buy. This one $30 cheaper. Thanks again.
     
    Motor T, Nov 22, 2014
    #8
  9. Motor T

    Vasco Costa Guest

    I'm also researching the market for an Asus motherboard supporting the 9
    series chipset from Intel. For what it's worth, the Asus Z97-K seems to
    be great value for the money, according to most reviews anyway.

    In case you're not thinking about overclocking the Asus H97-PRO is a
    very decent option too.
     
    Vasco Costa, Nov 22, 2014
    #9
  10. Motor T

    Paul Guest

    I would have bought the A version, just because VCore has two
    heatsinks on it. The A also has one more PCI Express slot.

    With the A, there are reviews to read. And then you can look
    at the failure cases, and see if there is a common theme to them.

    *******

    The reason I am suddenly concerned about heatsinks, is I bought
    an Asus motherboard about two months ago, it has a single cheap
    heatsink on VCore... and it is burning hot to the touch when
    running Prime95. I ended up fitting a cooling fan, blowing
    down on VCore. And you know how hard it is to mount
    cooling fans in odd places. A waste of my time,
    to have to set that up, just because a decent heatpipe
    cooler wasn't used in place of the flimsy single aluminum
    heatsink.

    The computer I'm typing this on, Asus uses a huge heatpipe
    cooler (three sides), that never gets more than a couple degrees
    above room temperature. Which is engineering to the other extreme
    (overkill). I wish I could swap coolers between boards, but of
    course they don't share common features or footprint.

    Paul
     
    Paul, Nov 22, 2014
    #10
  11. Motor T

    Flasherly Guest

    I've also got a MB, GByte tho, with burning chipsets (could be either
    support or video, according to SpeedFan, tho they're both on the hot
    side). I'll try pulling from the Big Box of Past Heatsinks something
    suitable, first, cutting it down with hacksaw, dremel tool, to fit and
    glue it on from the Big Box of Heatsink Compounds.

    Can be a mixed bag, effort and time involved, going for optimality
    among traditionalists (overclockers especially). First time I did it
    was with a pane of glass and car oxidizing compound, "figure-8"
    polishing mirror finishes into the bottom of heatsinks.

    As well, a lesser/major impediment for accounting engineering. I've
    an ART (studio rack stuff) amplifier, for instance, where I'm looking
    behind at engineers designing such things. "Well," says one, "when I
    walk up to a component and handle it, I don't feel comfortable about
    putting out that product, into the market, when I'm uncomfortable and
    concerned about burning my fingers." Now, that's quality control.

    Damn amp is a little hot box, whole of both its sides are massive
    heatsinks formed into the case design to account four power-output
    chips, two to a side. And, there's already a newer design model,
    (hey, mine is new at least to me, purchased a few, couple of years
    ago), supposedly with more efficient cooling. Perhaps fanless. I see
    electronics savvy reviewers with their highend gear -- "Well, I pulled
    out the fan because I don't need to run it that hard on my efficient
    $80K speakers." Ha - I pulled the fan and instead the finned-sides
    feeling like a car's radiator, the whole thing turns into a mini-oven.

    Now, there's another case of why in the hell can't a decent fan, with
    a piezo incorporated, engineered to audibly coincide for a RPM-failure
    monitored incident. I'm sure, it's just going to be nothing short of
    peachy if that friggin' amp fails and I reach over and find I'm
    grabbing a fanless hotbox.

    Every one of my tubed amps (four of them), I've flipped over to send
    the tubes' 450F radiant filament heat away from the backplane and
    underlying support circuitry. In certain terms, by those amps' terms,
    they're now acceptably known for "heads." ...Almost, someday I'll
    have to buy some wood to stain and slap together for prettier
    enclosures, than just grabbing one with a mind to stick not fingers
    into cap-circuitry territory, that keep stored their lethal voltages.
     
    Flasherly, Nov 23, 2014
    #11
  12. Motor T

    Al Drake Guest

    What you have here is one for my side. I am a firm believer in the "you
    get what you pay for" school of thought. In the long run it never pays
    to cheap out for a measly few bucks. While this good purchasing practice
    doesn't necessarily mean you have to though money away it does mean you
    can look for an affordable boat while not settling for a dingy. If you
    can't afford the bait don't go fishing or you might be left floundering.
    I have had several ASUS based systems but have now settled for Gigabyte.
     
    Al Drake, Nov 23, 2014
    #12
  13. Did you google "asus z97-e review"?
    Asus' website for the motherboard got a list:
    http://www.asus.com/Motherboards/Z97E/specifications/

    You don't need to worry too much about RAM compatibility issues...
     
    Mr. Man-wai Chang, Nov 23, 2014
    #13
  14. Motor T

    Paul Guest

    I took my eye off the ball, and missed the important details at the time.

    The receipt for the motherboard says $281.37 with tax included.
    Price isn't a guarantee of anything, really.

    The analysis at the time was a bit rushed, and I was more worried about
    whether the CPU cooler would fit, that the DIMMs could be fitted without
    having to take off the CPU cooler, and that the computer case side panel
    would close on the computer case, with the cooler in place. There's maybe
    a quarter inch between the top of the cooler, and the side of the case. So
    I was kinda fixated on getting that detail right.

    And they fooled me on the DIMMs too. The DIMM sockets are two-tone colored,
    which makes it look like the lock latches both move. When in fact one
    of the lock latches is the "fixed" kind that doesn't move. I would
    not have bought the motherboard if I'd known that. Normally, if the
    DIMM socket is all one color of plastic (one latch white, other latch
    matches the socket plastic), that's a hint it's the "half a socket"
    type.

    It's a good thing I bench tested and happened to poke it with a
    finger while it was sitting there. If I'd built up the system
    straight into the case, it would probably be frying itself
    to death at this very moment.

    Paul
     
    Paul, Nov 23, 2014
    #14
  15. Motor T

    RayLopez99 Guest

    Here's a more general question: who cares about the mobo? if a mobo supports certain operations, isn't that only true for bootup, and after that it becomes irrelevant?

    For example, supposed the motherboard supports SATA3. After bootup, the mobo hands off to the OS, and the OS supports these SATA drives, yes? So if can bootup, the mobo has performed its duties, and no need to worry anymore? Hence any mobo that supports the hardware you have is 'good enuf'? There is no interaction between OS and mobo after bootup?

    RL
     
    RayLopez99, Nov 29, 2014
    #15
  16. Motor T

    Paul Guest

    There is a small amount of BIOS code that runs, while the
    OS is running. This is only an issue with audio workstation
    design (only people working with low latency audio,
    care about the side effects of this issue). The code runs
    under System Management Mode. When SMM is invoked, the OS
    is no longer running. It's a very crude form of timesharing
    (and I don't know if the concept has been updated over the
    years by Intel or not). Maybe SMM steals 30*100usec or
    about 3 milliseconds per second of operation time. I don't
    really know what controls SMM rate, whether it's just
    a timer signal connected to SMI, or some system timer
    is set up to do it. There have been motherboards, with the
    Asus iPanel connected, where it appeared the SMI signal
    on the iPanel header, triggered SMM to update the iPanel
    display.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/System_Management_Mode

    (Suspected to use SMM code for support...)
    http://ht4u.net/old/2001/asusipanel/ipanel_eingebaut2.jpg

    *******

    You buy motherboards, according to the set of hardware
    interfaces they support. Say, for example, you're holding
    an M.2 drive in your hand, and want to plug it in. Then
    you need a motherboard with an M.2 socket. Or, with expansion
    slots (PCI Express), that could hold a separate card. The
    advantage of integrated connectors (onboard M.2) is the
    overall system cost is lower. I can get a USB3 port on
    a motherboard for peanuts, whereas adding a separate card
    might cost me $25. For example, in an impulse buy at the
    computer store, it cost me $25 for a serial port, $25 for
    a parallel port, and so on. If those ports are already
    on the motherboard, the incremental cost is a lot lower.
    For the manufacturer, back in the day, those two interfaces
    could be added for the cost of the connector alone.

    For gamer purposes, you may want slots for more than one
    video card. They make more expensive designs, from the
    CPU on down, for that purpose (LGA2011 with 40 lanes). That
    can double the cost of the basic system, if you throw in
    the bells and whistles (best of everything). But the video
    cards might cost $500 a piece, so it's all relative. The
    whole project is going to be expensive, and mainly for
    bragging rights. That's what some of those people do,
    is waggle their three or four video cards, in your
    face. What they don't tell you, is how uncomfortably
    warm it is in their computer room, when they're gaming :)
    You don't need a home heating system, if you buy
    all that stuff.

    Another selector for motherboards, is the adequacy of the
    design. Whether there were shortcuts taken or not. In a past
    Anandtech review, they managed to "burn out" several
    motherboards under their review, by putting 130W
    processors in the socket. And as it turned out later,
    there was advanced information available that would
    in a subtle way, have warned that the motherboards
    in question were only good with 65W or 89W processors.
    So when you're looking at the cheapest motherboards,
    there's a danger they could burn out on the first
    day, if you haven't been reading all possible documentation
    before hand. If you select a mid-range priced motherboard,
    one with good reviews from hundreds of buyers, less is
    likely to go wrong with them.

    Paul
     
    Paul, Nov 29, 2014
    #16
  17. Motor T

    Bill Guest

    What you say is not true. For instance, many buses are on the
    motherboard. An OS is just software (which is going to be loaded into
    RAM, caches, hard drives). The motherboard is facilitating the
    computers communication--even through it's network interface.
     
    Bill, Nov 29, 2014
    #17
  18. Motor T

    Flasherly Guest

    a more general question: who cares about the mobo? if a mobo supports
    certain operations, isn't that only true for bootup, and after that it
    becomes irrelevant?
    supposed the motherboard supports SATA3. After bootup, the mobo hands
    off to the OS, and the OS supports these SATA drives, yes? So if can
    bootup, the mobo has performed its duties, and no need to worry
    anymore? Hence any mobo that supports the hardware you have is 'good
    enuf'? There is no interaction between OS and mobo after bootup?

    -
    If that's all you want, then that holds true: 'The richest man in town
    is the man whose games are the cheapest [to play].' Buy into
    mid-level MB reputability, as Paul's saying, or let it 'hang' with
    some of the better reviewed, cheaper, if at best, among lesser-known,
    though qualified MB brandnames.

    To extrapolate:

    -
    (excerpts from Pensées [Blaise Pascal] part III, §233):
    "God is, or He is not"
    A Game is being played... where heads or tails will turn up.
    According to reason, you can defend neither of the propositions.
    You must wager (it is **not** optional). [Emphasis -Fl.]
    Let us weigh the gain and the loss in wagering that God is. Let us
    estimate these two chances. If you gain, you gain all; if you lose,
    you lose nothing.
    Wager, then, without hesitation that He is. (...)

    Entia non sunt multiplicanda praeter necessitatem.
    (Entities must not be multiplied beyond necessity).

    [however... -Fl.]

    ....Indeed, Ockham's contribution seems to be to restrict the operation
    of this principle in matters pertaining to miracles and God's power:
    so, in the Eucharist, a plurality of miracles is possible, simply
    because it pleases God.[17]

    This principle is sometimes phrased as:
    Pluralitas non est ponenda sine necessitate
    (Plurality should not be posited without necessity).[23]

    Frustra fit per plura quod potest fieri per pauciora.
    (It is futile to do with more things that which can be done with
    fewer).

    -wiki

    -
    Caveat emptor: May he beware, the subjunctive of cavere, to beware and
    emptor, buyer.

    [Beware -1) to be aware, -2) not without impunity, you are
    conjunctively -3) ware(s). -Fl.)
     
    Flasherly, Nov 29, 2014
    #18
  19. Motor T

    Larc Guest

    | On Friday, November 21, 2014 11:34:56 AM UTC-8, Motor T wrote:
    | > I see an ASUS Z97-E motherboard on Newegg I would like to get.
    |
    | Here's a more general question: who cares about the mobo? if a mobo supports certain operations, isn't that only true for bootup, and after that it becomes irrelevant?
    |
    | For example, supposed the motherboard supports SATA3. After bootup, the mobo hands off to the OS, and the OS supports these SATA drives, yes? So if can bootup, the mobo has performed its duties, and no need to worry anymore? Hence any mobo that supports the hardware you have is 'good enuf'? There is no interaction between OS and mobo after bootup?
    |
    | RL

    The OS only takes over operational control of the functions, not the functions
    themselves. The MB and OS relationship is a lot like a car and driver situation. No
    matter how good the driver, he can only do what the car lets him do (you are the
    owner of the car and employer of the driver telling him where you want to go).

    Larc
     
    Larc, Nov 29, 2014
    #19
  20. Motor T

    John Doe Guest

    Regular Google Groups troll...

    --
     
    John Doe, Nov 29, 2014
    #20
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