Must I root the iPad to modify the hosts file (or is there a better way)?

Discussion in 'iPad' started by Liam O'Connor, Mar 6, 2014.

  1. I only recently obtained an iPad and need to modify the hosts file.

    Is there any way to modify the hosts file without rooting?

    I've never rooted a device, so, I'm not even sure I know what that
    means; but all I want to do is to add the MVP Hosts file to the iPad.

    I know all about the myriad browser plugins which purportedly block popups
    and malicious web sites, but, they're not as portable as a hosts file
    across platforms and browsders, and, I've been using the famous MVP hosts
    file for more than a decade on all my platforms (adding hundreds of
    objectionable hosts on my own), so I already have a lot invested in the
    hosts file that I wish to take advantage of for the iPad.

    Note: I don't have this problem on Android simply because my S3 Android
    smartphone is too tiny for me to use with the web browser; so it only shows
    itself on a device where a web browser begins to become practical.
     
    Liam O'Connor, Mar 6, 2014
    #1
    1. Advertisements

  2. The MVP Hosts file is a windows thing and your iPad does not run
    windows.

    If you were an experienced unix user, it might make sense to root your
    iPad. It is hard to image that it is worthwhile to adapt the data in
    your file to /etc/hosts.

    Malicious web sites are not generally a problem on iPads. The most
    likely effect they have is to crash your browser.
     
    Doug Anderson, Mar 6, 2014
    #2
    1. Advertisements

  3. Liam O'Connor

    Guest Guest

    it doesn't need to run windows. it's a hostfile of sites to be blocked
    and would work fine on an ipad, however, it needs to be jailbroken to
    have access.
     
    Guest, Mar 6, 2014
    #3
  4. Liam O'Connor

    Guest Guest

    you don't.
    no, and it's called jailbreaking.
    just get one of the various browsers that have ad blocking built in.
     
    Guest, Mar 6, 2014
    #4
  5. Liam O'Connor

    Bert Guest

    In Doug Anderson
    Web sites don't have to be even the least bit malicious to crash the
    iPad's browser.
     
    Bert, Mar 6, 2014
    #5
  6. True 'dat.
     
    Doug Anderson, Mar 6, 2014
    #6
  7. Liam O'Connor

    Guest Guest

    that's because the browser and/or ios is buggy.

    7.1 should fix a lot of that.
     
    Guest, Mar 6, 2014
    #7
  8. Liam O'Connor

    Bert Guest

    In nospam
    I've always assumed the problem was due to application programmers not
    being particularly careful about checking the status of their memory
    acquisition requests. The browser isn't the only program to simply
    vanish when things get complicated; it's just the one that's more likely
    to run into situations it can't handle.

    I suppose the OS could be simply blowing away programs that make
    requests that can't be satisfied, but that would be really stupid.
    How?
     
    Bert, Mar 7, 2014
    #8
  9. Liam O'Connor

    Guest Guest

    in other words, buggy.

    if you don't properly check and handle error conditions, the app might
    crash, and not just memory.

    browsers also can't know in advance what web pages a user will visit
    and it's possible that a webpage causes webkit to crash. safari on the
    mac crashes every so often too.
    that would be unlikely.
    the springboard crashing is reportedly fixed, an issue which plagues
    ios 7 users, notably on the 5s.
     
    Guest, Mar 7, 2014
    #9
  10. The MVP hosts file, which works on Linux and Windows just
    fine (and I presume on MAC), also blocks obnoxious sites
    by the tens of thousands.

    Plus, it blocks advertisements.
    And, those annoying sites that scream at you via uwanted video.
    And, tons of tracking sites.
    etc.

    And, the hosts file is portable, or, at least it should be,
    across all platforms (Windows, Linux, Mac, iOS, and Android).

    The only problem is the write permissions...
     
    Liam O'Connor, Mar 8, 2014
    #10
  11. That only solves part of the problem.

    It doesn't prevent all known tracking sites.
    It doesn't prevent malicious sites.
    It doesn't block all known popup sites.
    And, it's not portable across all platforms.
    And, it's not easy for you to add a site, which is
    then portable to all your other platforms.

    In short, the MVP hosts file is fantastic, but,
    it seems it's only easy on the computer platforms.

    On both Android and iOS, it looks like I'll have
    to learn how to root/jailbreak them, in order to
    take advantage of the inherent beauty of a hosts file.

    Thanks!
     
    Liam O'Connor, Mar 8, 2014
    #11
  12. Liam O'Connor

    Guest Guest

    it solves the major component.
    depending on the browser, you may be able to add more.
    malicious sites are a non-issue on ipads. for one, executable code on
    an ipad must be codesigned and it not possible for a site to codesign
    malware for your ipad.
    popups aren't really a problem on ipads. i've seen the occasional new
    tab but it's very rare.
    so what?
    it's easier there.
    jailbreaking brings a number of caveats, like not being to update until
    a new jailbreak is issued, which could be a very long time.
     
    Guest, Mar 8, 2014
    #12
  13. I don't disagree. The good news is that a hosts file shouldn't
    cause *anything* to crash, since all it does is redirect
    tens of thousands of web sites to nowhere, in effect.

    However, I must agree with you that if this is all I need on
    iOS, then jailbreaking seems like too much work to just install
    a single file, as nice as that file is.

    On Windows, & Linux, that one file is indispensible.
    I'm likely to do without it, on iOS (and Android).
     
    Liam O'Connor, Mar 9, 2014
    #13
  14. Liam O'Connor

    DevilsPGD Guest

    By resolving the underlying issues in the browser and/or iOS that are
    causing crashes?

    It won't fix every application level crash, but since Safari is only
    updated when the OS is updated, Apple doesn't push patches out to Safari
    normally, and therefore any bugfixes wait in the pipeline a good long
    time.
     
    DevilsPGD, Mar 10, 2014
    #14
    1. Advertisements

Ask a Question

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

You'll need to choose a username for the site, which only take a couple of moments (here). After that, you can post your question and our members will help you out.