Guy gets caught while trying to stop drivers from talking oncellphones while driving

Discussion in 'iPhone' started by Abe Swanson, Nov 20, 2014.

  1. Abe Swanson

    Your Name Guest

    Unfortunately these people with jammers think they're doing something
    for good, when in reality all they are succeeding in doing is making
    the selfish morons fiddle with their phones even more trying to get it
    to work again while still driving along. :-\
     
    Your Name, Nov 22, 2014
    #21
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  2. Abe Swanson

    Kurt Ullman Guest

    We'll be here all week, drive safely and remember to tip your
    waitresses.
     
    Kurt Ullman, Nov 22, 2014
    #22
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  3. Abe Swanson

    Lewis Guest

    A death during the commission of a crime is first degree murder
    regardless of the circumstances or cause of the death. This is true here
    in Colorado, is true in California, and as I understand it is true in
    Florida.

    So, if you rob a store and the clerk dies of a heart attack, that is
    first degree murder.

    Jamming cellphone signals is illegal,. The jammer also jams emergency
    vehicle communications. If that jamming caused *in any way* a person to
    die, then the person jamming the signals could be charged with first
    degree murder.
     
    Lewis, Nov 22, 2014
    #23
  4. Abe Swanson

    Kurt Ullman Guest

    And it could very easily be a Federal charge since cell phones come
    under the umbrella of the FCC
     
    Kurt Ullman, Nov 22, 2014
    #24
  5. Abe Swanson

    Kurt Ullman Guest

    You missed the commercial.
     
    Kurt Ullman, Nov 22, 2014
    #25
  6. Abe Swanson

    290jkl Guest

    Wrong when the death is caused by the victim of the crime defending himself.
    Fraid not.
    Wrong.
     
    290jkl, Nov 22, 2014
    #26
  7. Abe Swanson

    News Guest


    Holiday Inn Express laughable.
     
    News, Nov 22, 2014
    #27
  8. Abe Swanson

    BobbyK Guest

    Funny reply of the year!
     
    BobbyK, Nov 22, 2014
    #28
  9. Abe Swanson

    BobbyK Guest

    Yep, but it's still a big stretch to attach that to legal training.
     
    BobbyK, Nov 22, 2014
    #29
  10. Abe Swanson

    News Guest


    Which was the point, since the OP's posts prove he obviously has none.
     
    News, Nov 22, 2014
    #30
  11. Only if the death is that of the perpetrator. If it's a third party,
    then it is first degree murder, charged to the perpetrator.
     
    Michelle Steiner, Nov 22, 2014
    #31
  12. Abe Swanson

    Lewis Guest

    No, I am still at sea on that one.
     
    Lewis, Nov 22, 2014
    #32
  13. Abe Swanson

    Lewis Guest

     
    Lewis, Nov 22, 2014
    #33
  14. Abe Swanson

    Lewis Guest

    Unless the law has changed very recently in California, yes it is.
    The relevant link:

    <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Felony_murder_rule>
    "The rule of felony murder is a legal doctrine in some common law
    jurisdictions that broadens the crime of murder in two ways. First, when
    an offender kills accidentally or without specific intent to kill in the
    commission of a felony, the offender can be charged with murder. Second,
    it makes any participant in such a felony criminally liable for any
    deaths that occur during or in furtherance of that felony."

    And Felony Murder is classified as 1st Degree murder, as cited on the
    page you linked to.
    Yeah, I'm sure I'm going to believe you.
     
    Lewis, Nov 22, 2014
    #34
  15. Abe Swanson

    Your Name Guest

    That must be the city-folk version of tipping cows. ;-)
     
    Your Name, Nov 22, 2014
    #35
  16. Then - as a shopper - I'd better not have a heart-attack when someone
    steals a packet of crisps!
     
    Frank Slootweg, Nov 22, 2014
    #36
  17. Abe Swanson

    Savageduck Guest

    Actually true in California. There have been several cases where a
    partner in crime has been killed as a result of action by a victim and
    the survivor has been charged and convicted of murder.
    This falls under the felony murder rule. Basically stated, a felony
    murder is when a person is killed during the commission of a felony. A
    felony is a serious crime that's usually punishable by more than one
    year in prison. There are certain key differences between felony murder
    and most other forms of murder.
    Most forms of murder require an intent to commit death. Felony murder
    only requires the intent to commit the felony. During the course of the
    felony, any homicide will be considered murder, whether it's
    intentional or accidental.

    This is true even if a participant isn't directly responsible for the
    death. For example, the driver of a getaway car can be charged with
    felony murder if his partner accidentally shoots someone while
    attempting to rob a bank. There are a fair number of individuals
    serving life terms in California because of the felony murder rule. I
    actual knowledge of two home invasion cases where in the first, two
    partners in crime were killed by the home owner, and the survivor (who
    was wounded) is serving a life term. In the other there were two
    partners in crime, one killed, the other convicted of murder under the
    felony murder rule.
    It has been true in California for the 25 years I was a Law Enforcement
    officer in this State.
    That depends on the will of the local D.A..
     
    Savageduck, Nov 22, 2014
    #37
  18. Abe Swanson

    290jkl Guest

    Even if it's the death of someone other than the perp.
    Wrong.
     
    290jkl, Nov 22, 2014
    #38
  19. Abe Swanson

    290jkl Guest

    No it is not, particularly in the situation I mentioned.
    Nope, that defines what is first degree murder.
    A separate issue entirely to what is FIRST DEGREE murder.

    is a legal doctrine in some common law
    But not with FIRST DEGREE murder.

    Second,
    Still not FIRST DEGREE MURDER.
    Not always.
    It doesn’t say that that absolutely. In fact it says very explicitly indeed
    that first
    degree murder requires intent, planning and malice aforethought and if there
    is
    no intent it becomes second degree murder. So you are just plain wrong.
    Doesn’t matter what you believe.
     
    290jkl, Nov 22, 2014
    #39
  20. Abe Swanson

    290jkl Guest

    But not with FIRST DEGREE MURDER.
    There is also a key difference between FIRST DEGREE and SECOND DEGREE
    murder.
    But not FIRST DEGREE murder when there is no intent to murder.
    Felony murder isnt the same thing as FIRST DEGREE murder.
    But not for FIRST DEGREE murder.

    In the other there were two
    Again, he wasn’t convicted of FIRST DEGREE murder.
    No, not with FIRST DEGREE murder. You are talking
    about FELONY murder, a different crime entirely.
    Nope, the court would toss it in the bin if he was stupid enough to try
    that.

    It isnt even felony murder either.
     
    290jkl, Nov 22, 2014
    #40
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