AT&T Locks Apple SIM Cards on new iPad Air 2 & iPad mini 3

Discussion in 'iPad' started by David Howard, Oct 24, 2014.

  1. David Howard

    David Howard Guest

    And it's free unlimited USA calls, to and from that number to landlines?
     
    David Howard, Oct 31, 2014
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  2. David Howard

    David Howard Guest

    I was assuming a road trip when I made that statement.
    If we're at home, WiFi is the best of all worlds.
    But, if you're sitting at home, then there's little need for map routing.
     
    David Howard, Oct 31, 2014
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  3. David Howard

    David Howard Guest

    I was saying that it's hard to beat Google Maps, when you have an Internet
    connection.

    But, you wont *always* have an Internet connection on the road.

    When you have *no Internet*, then the value of Google Maps goes instantly
    down, and the value of the offline apps kick in.
     
    David Howard, Oct 31, 2014
  4. David Howard

    David Howard Guest

    I tested them a year or two ago on iOS, and I came up with:
    1. Google Maps (only when you have data)

    When you have no data, then:
    2. CoPilot (mainly because of accuracy and POIs and adress lookups)
    3. Be-On-Road (a distant third to CoPilot)
    4. MapsWithMe (a distant fourth)

    I also add (for when I have data):
    a. iExit (for finding what is at the next exit)
    b. GasBuddy (for finding cheap gas on the road)

    That's what's in my MAP folder (along with Apple Maps).
     
    David Howard, Oct 31, 2014
  5. David Howard

    David Howard Guest

    Then CoPilot *payware* is likely the best, on both platforms, if you need
    it to work offline.

    All the rest of the freeware apps use the OSM maps, which are fine for
    routing, but, the POIs and address lookups in OSM are still dismal by way
    of comparison to the professional POIs & Address Lookups which Google &
    CoPilot use.
     
    David Howard, Oct 31, 2014
  6. David Howard

    DevilsPGD Guest

    The whole original idea behind SIMs was to let people roam between
    phones, pop it in the car phone of the car you're using right now, only
    use it in your portable when you're away from your car, etc.

    It's a different world today, but ultimately, there's still generally a
    1:1 relationship between SIM and phone number, but they're also not
    "locked", you can get a new number assigned by calling your carrier and
    paying a small fee.
     
    DevilsPGD, Oct 31, 2014
  7. David Howard

    DevilsPGD Guest

    Try when you're roaming at $5-$10/MB, and getting far enough off the
    beaten path to where there is no signal at all.

    Look, I agree with what you're saying, I use online maps exclusively
    myself. But offline maps still have a need and a place.
     
    DevilsPGD, Oct 31, 2014
  8. David Howard

    David Howard Guest

    If you want it to work across platoforms, *and* you want it to work
    offline, *and* you want it to have an accurate street & POI lookup
    offline, then your best choice, IMHO, is CoPilot (although they nickle
    and dime you to death).

    There are more map-routing choices on Android than on iOS (the best being
    Navigator and OsmAnd~).
     
    David Howard, Oct 31, 2014
  9. David Howard

    Guest Guest

    the phone number is associated with the sim, regardless of carrier.
    that's the point of a sim, so you can swap phones at any time.
    sims are sims, and there can be a reason to lock (for the carrier,
    anyway). at&t gophone locks sims to phones in some cases and t-mobile
    blocks certain device classes on certain plans.
     
    Guest, Oct 31, 2014
  10. David Howard

    Guest Guest

    it's a cellular modem that plugs into a usb port.
     
    Guest, Oct 31, 2014
  11. David Howard

    Erilar Guest

    I've found it useful for years now, through various incarnations, on my
    original iPad and now it's even better on the Air with GPS .
     
    Erilar, Oct 31, 2014
  12. David Howard

    Erilar Guest

    I have LESS than no interest in having to listen to and obey spoken
    directions when I'm driving. I don't need the distraction and lack of
    choice. A nice reliable compass built in to my dashboard would be useful.
    If I want step- by-step directions, I'll download them alomg with maps in
    advance. I've been a passenger in cars led astray by the talking things
    more than once, and I seldom AM a passenger.
     
    Erilar, Oct 31, 2014
  13. David Howard

    Patty Winter Guest

    How so? You can get free maps for an entire continent, then add voice
    directions for a one-time fee of $9.95. What other features would most
    people need?


    Patty
     
    Patty Winter, Oct 31, 2014
  14. David Howard

    David Howard Guest

    You probably know better than I do because I never *paid* for CoPilot.

    When I called them, and emailed them, I couldn't get a straight answer
    out of them (my question was mostly about the difference between the
    Android and iOS CoPilot with respect to voice and what costs what).

    I could never get the same answer twice out of them.

    So, I'll defer to you, but, it "was" my understanding, after that unhappy
    experience trying to get information from them (mostly about the talking
    of directions versus streets plus directions) that they charge for a
    bunch of stuff that the others don't.

    So, with that said, let me ask you.

    If I want a map for an entire state, is that part of the 10 dollar fee?
    If I then want the map of the entire region, is that also included?
    Likewise if I want the map of the USA, is that included?

    It was my understanding that they charge for each map, but I might be
    wrong. They certainly charge for the voice to work (after the trial
    period).

    Does paying $10 for the voice (when you already get one state free), also
    give you the maps of the entire USA, for example?
     
    David Howard, Nov 1, 2014
  15. David Howard

    David Howard Guest

    If you don't want spoken directions (distances, turns, & street names),
    then your task of finding suitable freeware doubles or triples, even on
    iOS.

    I think you're on iOS, so, for you, CoPilot freeware will be great, as
    long as you stay within on state (hopefully a big one). If you want more
    than one state, then you can fork over the 10 bucks or switch to Be-On-
    Road or MapsWithMe, but, be advised, they both use OSM maps.

    As I said, the OSM maps, while certainly not as accurate as Google Maps,
    are good enough, but the POIs and address lookups are atrocious (but
    getting less atrocious every day, since they're a crowd-sourced database).

    Given the OSM databases are lacking, for iOS and Android, I'd go with
    CoPilot freeware (not only for the map accuracy but mostly for the POI &
    address lookup accuracy), unless you need more than one state, if you
    didn't need voice.

    If you want voice, on Android, then you kind'a need Navigator (but it
    doesn't do street names.) On Android, there is also ZANavi, which has
    everything, but, it *all* stinks, so, don't let the checkboxes fool you.
     
    David Howard, Nov 1, 2014
  16. David Howard

    Patty Winter Guest

    No, there is no fee. You can get all of the U.S. and Canada for free.
    I just checked their website and discovered that I was wrong about
    entire continents being free; they have Europe divided into multiple
    maps, and the U.S./Canada maps are obviously missing parts of North
    America. But they get most of it. :)

    I live in California, but recently a friend and I were in Ontario,
    and CoPilot successfully showed us a bunch of dirt roads along the
    north edge of Lake Erie.

    They charge for each map *after* the first free one--and which one
    that is is entirely up to you. Yes, as I mentioned, there is a one-
    time fee for voice directions. Turns out it's $9.99, not $9.95.
    There is no charge for maps of the entire U.S. unless you have already
    downloaded a different region for your free introductory map.


    Patty
     
    Patty Winter, Nov 1, 2014
  17. David Howard

    Patty Winter Guest

    Huh? It gets easier, not harder. She could use CoPilot GPS for free,
    since she doesn't need to pay for the voice directions.

    Are you saying that the Android version of CoPilot requires you to pay
    for each state? Is that why you think the iOS version does? I'm surprised
    they'd be that different.


    Patty
     
    Patty Winter, Nov 1, 2014
  18. David Howard

    David Howard Guest

    Are you sure we're talking the right maps?

    Any map program can give you OSM maps (which includes the all-important
    POI's and Address Lookups). This is free.

    But, the non-OSM maps (for lack of a better term) are *not* free.
    Of all the map companies, Alk CoPilot allows you to have *one* free non-
    OSM map.

    Looking for the brand of the map at
    http://copilotgps.com/us/personal/android.asp

    I see the "asterisk" next to the phrase "Detailed street maps of the U.S.
    and Canada*", and looking at the asterisk small print, I see "The map of
    Canada is available via in-app purchase from the CoPilot Premium USA app".

    So, they make it a bit more complicated than they need to.

    Then going to the downloads page http://copilotgps.com/us/compare/, it's
    still not yet obvious (what I already know to be true) that you get only
    *one* free map that is non OSM style.

    But, notice that "voice guidance" and "text to speech" are separate items
    that require money. What I was trying to find out from ALK in days past
    was whether this was a SINGLE $10 fee, or multiple $10 fees (one per
    item). I still don't know the answer, as the only way to know is to pay
    first and be happy or sad.

    I suspect it's a single payment, but, is it?
     
    David Howard, Nov 1, 2014
  19. David Howard

    David Howard Guest

    I just checked my Android phone, and had to use a magnifying glass
    (literally) to see that Alk Copilot on Android uses NAVTEQ maps for the
    one free map.

    On the iPad, I could see it easily, in Settings > About CoPilot, near
    the bottom.

    So, they lock the one free NAVTEQ map, to something. they do have our IMEI
    in there, which might mean they lock that one free map to our IMEI (what
    else could they use?).

    I do now agree with you, that, if you can *fit* it, you can make the
    entire USA be your one free NAVTEQ map. For me, even with a 64GB iPad and
    Android device, I only have the CTY_ALK.NA-Southwest NAVTEQ map installed.

    One caveat/warning, is that, while they *say* you can't switch free maps
    (e.g., if you're on a cross-country trip), you actually can. At least, I
    did, and it seems to work (but, I guess they can stop that at any time).
     
    David Howard, Nov 1, 2014
  20. David Howard

    David Howard Guest

    I found out, by experiment, that I could delete the one free Navteq map,
    and, despite what the user interface tells me, I could then download a
    *different* one free Navteq map.

    So, for free, you get (essentially):
    a. One free map (of whatever size you can fit on your device)
    b. No Voice direction
    c. No Text to Speech

    My one question to them (which I never got answered) is whether the $10
    for *each* additional Navteq maps allows *both* voice directions and text
    to speech.

    Specifically, if I add a second Navteq map for $10, do I also get *both*
    the "turn left in 100 feet" and the subsequent "turn left in 100 feet
    onto main street" voices?
     
    David Howard, Nov 1, 2014
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