upside down photos?

Discussion in 'iPad' started by Brian, Jun 6, 2012.

  1. Brian

    Brian Guest

    I took a photo using the back camera on the iPad using the camera app that
    came with the iPad. I e-mailed it to a friend from the iPad. My friend said
    that the photo I e-mailed him is upside down. What went wrong?

    --
    Regards Brian
     
    Brian, Jun 6, 2012
    #1
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  2. Brian

    David Empson Guest

    Brian <> wrote:

    > I took a photo using the back camera on the iPad using the camera app that
    > came with the iPad. I e-mailed it to a friend from the iPad. My friend said
    > that the photo I e-mailed him is upside down. What went wrong?


    The iPad camera has a natural orientation: landscape, with the camera at
    the top. If you take a photo with the iPad in any other orientation, it
    is actually saved in the natural orientation, but has an "Orientation"
    tag in the EXIF data which indiciates which way to rotate the photo for
    display.

    If you take a portrait or upside-down landscape photo, it is the
    responsibility of the viewing software to rotate the photo the right
    way. Unfortunately not all software understands the Orientation EXIF tag
    and just displays the photo in the order the data appears in the file,
    resulting in it being rotated incorrectly.

    In my experience, you are most likely to encounter this when displaying
    the photo on Windows (particularly older versions of Windows, such as
    XP), but I expect there are also some older Mac applications which don't
    know about the Orientation tag.

    To avoid this, always take photos on the iPad in landscape orientation
    with the camera at the top.

    The other option is to pre-process the photos with an applciation which
    physically rotates the photo image in the JPEG according to the
    orientation tag (and deletes the orientation tag or modifies it to
    indicate no rotation is required).

    I haven't bothered hunting down software which can do this in a simple
    way. I can do it on my Mac using the "exiftool" command line tool to
    delete the orientation tag, then Preview or GraphicConverter to
    physically rotate the photo to the correct orientation.
    --
    David Empson
     
    David Empson, Jun 6, 2012
    #2
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  3. Brian

    nospam Guest

    In article <>,
    Brian <> wrote:

    > I took a photo using the back camera on the iPad using the camera app that
    > came with the iPad. I e-mailed it to a friend from the iPad. My friend said
    > that the photo I e-mailed him is upside down. What went wrong?


    his software is ignoring the orientation tag.

    he needs to update whatever software he's using or use something else
    that does.
     
    nospam, Jun 6, 2012
    #3
  4. Brian

    Alan Browne Guest

    On 2012-06-06 03:00 , Brian wrote:
    > I took a photo using the back camera on the iPad using the camera app that
    > came with the iPad. I e-mailed it to a friend from the iPad. My friend said
    > that the photo I e-mailed him is upside down. What went wrong?


    He didn't use a crossover cable on his ethernet?


    --
    "Civilization is the limitless multiplication of unnecessary necessities."
    -Samuel Clemens.
     
    Alan Browne, Jun 6, 2012
    #4
  5. Brian

    Tom Stiller Guest

    In article <>,
    Alan Browne <> wrote:

    > On 2012-06-06 03:00 , Brian wrote:
    > > I took a photo using the back camera on the iPad using the camera app that
    > > came with the iPad. I e-mailed it to a friend from the iPad. My friend said
    > > that the photo I e-mailed him is upside down. What went wrong?

    >
    > He didn't use a crossover cable on his ethernet?


    T'wasn't that, the picture was intended for the other side of the room.

    --
    PRAY, v. To ask that the laws of the universe be annulled in behalf
    of a single petitioner confessedly unworthy. -- Ambrose Bierce
     
    Tom Stiller, Jun 6, 2012
    #5
  6. Brian

    Alan Browne Guest

    On 2012-06-06 17:26 , Tom Stiller wrote:
    > In article <>,
    > Alan Browne <> wrote:
    >
    >> On 2012-06-06 03:00 , Brian wrote:
    >>> I took a photo using the back camera on the iPad using the camera app that
    >>> came with the iPad. I e-mailed it to a friend from the iPad. My friend said
    >>> that the photo I e-mailed him is upside down. What went wrong?

    >>
    >> He didn't use a crossover cable on his ethernet?

    >
    > T'wasn't that, the picture was intended for the other side of the room.


    Of course. I'm so new at this.


    --
    "Civilization is the limitless multiplication of unnecessary necessities."
    -Samuel Clemens.
     
    Alan Browne, Jun 6, 2012
    #6
  7. Brian

    Brian Guest

    David Empson <> wrote:
    > Brian <> wrote:
    >
    >> I took a photo using the back camera on the iPad using the camera app that
    >> came with the iPad. I e-mailed it to a friend from the iPad. My friend said
    >> that the photo I e-mailed him is upside down. What went wrong?

    >
    > The iPad camera has a natural orientation: landscape, with the camera at
    > the top. If you take a photo with the iPad in any other orientation, it
    > is actually saved in the natural orientation, but has an "Orientation"
    > tag in the EXIF data which indiciates which way to rotate the photo for
    > display.
    >
    > If you take a portrait or upside-down landscape photo, it is the
    > responsibility of the viewing software to rotate the photo the right
    > way. Unfortunately not all software understands the Orientation EXIF tag
    > and just displays the photo in the order the data appears in the file,
    > resulting in it being rotated incorrectly.
    >
    > In my experience, you are most likely to encounter this when displaying
    > the photo on Windows (particularly older versions of Windows, such as
    > XP), but I expect there are also some older Mac applications which don't
    > know about the Orientation tag.
    >
    > To avoid this, always take photos on the iPad in landscape orientation
    > with the camera at the top.
    >
    > The other option is to pre-process the photos with an applciation which
    > physically rotates the photo image in the JPEG according to the
    > orientation tag (and deletes the orientation tag or modifies it to
    > indicate no rotation is required).
    >
    > I haven't bothered hunting down software which can do this in a simple
    > way. I can do it on my Mac using the "exiftool" command line tool to
    > delete the orientation tag, then Preview or GraphicConverter to
    > physically rotate the photo to the correct orientation.


    Thanks David.
    I'll remember to hold the iPad the correct way next time.
    Most e-mail program are likely to display the photo the way it is received.

    --
    Regards Brian
     
    Brian, Jun 7, 2012
    #7
  8. Brian

    nospam Guest

    In article
    <>, Brian
    <> wrote:

    > I'll remember to hold the iPad the correct way next time.


    any way you hold it is the correct way.

    the orientation of the ipad at the time a photo is take is written to
    the image, just as it is with standard digital cameras.

    properly written software will read that tag and display the image
    correctly.

    > Most e-mail program are likely to display the photo the way it is received.


    software that ignores the orientation tag is broken.
     
    nospam, Jun 7, 2012
    #8
  9. Brian

    David Empson Guest

    nospam <> wrote:

    > In article
    > <>, Brian
    > <> wrote:
    >
    > > I'll remember to hold the iPad the correct way next time.

    >
    > any way you hold it is the correct way.
    >
    > the orientation of the ipad at the time a photo is take is written to
    > the image, just as it is with standard digital cameras.
    >
    > properly written software will read that tag and display the image
    > correctly.
    >
    > > Most e-mail program are likely to display the photo the way it is received.

    >
    > software that ignores the orientation tag is broken.


    Which unfortunately includes the standard photo viewer included with
    Windows XP, and I've just confirmed the standard Windows 7 photo viewer
    is equally broken (presumably Vista too), as is the standard Windows 7
    Paint application and Internet Explorer. Given the evidence, I expect
    the standard Windows 7 e-mail client (which I don't use) has the same
    problem.

    Firefox 12 and Thunderbird 12 on Windows 7 also display the wrong
    orientation. This might be due to using a standard API provided by
    Windows.

    A third party image viewer (IrfanView) got it right.

    On my Mac (Lion):

    Finder, Preview, QuickLook and Mail got it right, as did third party
    applications GraphicConverter (an old version) and Pixelmator.

    Safari and QuickTime Player 7 got it wrong, as did third party
    applications Firefox and Postbox (a Thunderbird derivative).

    I suspect that the QuickTime 7 JPEG image component doesn't handle
    orientation, and it is probably being used by all Carbon applications
    (and by Safari, but not by Mail), while Cocoa applications are using a
    more modern API which understands orientation.


    Judging from a quick Google search, the Orientation tag has existed
    since 2002 or earlier. Heavy usage might not have started until the
    iPhone and other smartphones had cameras and accelerometers, which is
    circa mid 2007. I expect many digital cameras are using it now.

    Windows XP and QuickTime 7 not supporting the Orientation tag are
    understandable given the age of their code base and only getting
    security fixes, but what is Microsoft's excuse for not supporting it in
    Windows 7?

    --
    David Empson
     
    David Empson, Jun 7, 2012
    #9
  10. Brian

    nospam Guest

    In article <1klbjjd.18mjflx171uy6nN%>, David
    Empson <> wrote:

    > Judging from a quick Google search, the Orientation tag has existed
    > since 2002 or earlier. Heavy usage might not have started until the
    > iPhone and other smartphones had cameras and accelerometers, which is
    > circa mid 2007. I expect many digital cameras are using it now.


    most digital cameras had orientation sensors and were writing the tag
    by mid-2000s.

    photoshop & lightroom do the right thing and have for quite a while
    (lightroom since 1.0 but it's a newer product).

    > Windows XP and QuickTime 7 not supporting the Orientation tag are
    > understandable given the age of their code base and only getting
    > security fixes, but what is Microsoft's excuse for not supporting it in
    > Windows 7?


    there isn't any.
     
    nospam, Jun 7, 2012
    #10
  11. Brian

    Brian Guest

    David Empson <> wrote:
    > nospam <> wrote:
    >
    >> In article
    >> <>, Brian
    >> <> wrote:
    >>
    >>> I'll remember to hold the iPad the correct way next time.

    >>
    >> any way you hold it is the correct way.
    >>
    >> the orientation of the ipad at the time a photo is take is written to
    >> the image, just as it is with standard digital cameras.
    >>
    >> properly written software will read that tag and display the image
    >> correctly.
    >>
    >>> Most e-mail program are likely to display the photo the way it is received.

    >>
    >> software that ignores the orientation tag is broken.

    >
    > Which unfortunately includes the standard photo viewer included with
    > Windows XP, and I've just confirmed the standard Windows 7 photo viewer
    > is equally broken (presumably Vista too), as is the standard Windows 7
    > Paint application and Internet Explorer. Given the evidence, I expect
    > the standard Windows 7 e-mail client (which I don't use) has the same
    > problem.
    >
    > Firefox 12 and Thunderbird 12 on Windows 7 also display the wrong
    > orientation. This might be due to using a standard API provided by
    > Windows.
    >
    > A third party image viewer (IrfanView) got it right.
    >
    > On my Mac (Lion):
    >
    > Finder, Preview, QuickLook and Mail got it right, as did third party
    > applications GraphicConverter (an old version) and Pixelmator.
    >
    > Safari and QuickTime Player 7 got it wrong, as did third party
    > applications Firefox and Postbox (a Thunderbird derivative).
    >
    > I suspect that the QuickTime 7 JPEG image component doesn't handle
    > orientation, and it is probably being used by all Carbon applications
    > (and by Safari, but not by Mail), while Cocoa applications are using a
    > more modern API which understands orientation.
    >
    >
    > Judging from a quick Google search, the Orientation tag has existed
    > since 2002 or earlier. Heavy usage might not have started until the
    > iPhone and other smartphones had cameras and accelerometers, which is
    > circa mid 2007. I expect many digital cameras are using it now.
    >
    > Windows XP and QuickTime 7 not supporting the Orientation tag are
    > understandable given the age of their code base and only getting
    > security fixes, but what is Microsoft's excuse for not supporting it in
    > Windows 7?


    The person I e-mailed it to has Microsoft Outlook working on a PC computer.
    It must have displayed the photo in the body of the message up side down.


    --
    Regards Brian
     
    Brian, Jun 7, 2012
    #11
  12. On Wed, 06 Jun 2012 09:04:57 -0700, nospam <> wrote:

    >In article <>,
    >Brian <> wrote:
    >
    >> I took a photo using the back camera on the iPad using the camera app that
    >> came with the iPad. I e-mailed it to a friend from the iPad. My friend said
    >> that the photo I e-mailed him is upside down. What went wrong?

    >
    >his software is ignoring the orientation tag.
    >
    >he needs to update whatever software he's using or use something else
    >that does.



    Why not have the app that takes it and sets it that way OFFER the user
    an option to flip it at creation/save time. Godfdamned AppleTards
    foisting a 'norm' again that is NOT normal.

    I mean bass ackwards is bass ackwards.

    Having the prompt to flip the tag should be the norm, since the picture
    as saved, is not (normal). Failing to update the software to include
    either full exif edit session capacity or a simple switch for this
    debacle (yes, it IS) should be forthcoming forthwith!

    But NOOOOOOOooooooooo...
     
    My Name Is Tzu How Do You Do, Jun 7, 2012
    #12
  13. Brian

    David Empson Guest

    nospam <> wrote:

    > In article <1klbjjd.18mjflx171uy6nN%>, David
    > Empson <> wrote:
    >
    > > Judging from a quick Google search, the Orientation tag has existed
    > > since 2002 or earlier. Heavy usage might not have started until the
    > > iPhone and other smartphones had cameras and accelerometers, which is
    > > circa mid 2007. I expect many digital cameras are using it now.

    >
    > most digital cameras had orientation sensors and were writing the tag
    > by mid-2000s.
    >
    > photoshop & lightroom do the right thing and have for quite a while
    > (lightroom since 1.0 but it's a newer product).


    Given the evidence, nothing outside Photoshop and other photo
    editing/processing software would have been paying attention to the
    orientation tag back then.

    The key problem is e-mailing photos directly from an iOS device. If 90%
    of the potential recipients will get an incorrectly oriented photo,
    blaming the recipient for their faulty software is not helpful, and
    requiring them to rotate the photo doesn't seem all that good either.

    An app on the iOS device to physically rotate the photo (and adjust the
    orientation tag) seems the best option. There is an iPhone App "Rotate
    Mailer" which claims to do the right thing, but I haven't tried it.

    Otherwise the easiest way to avoid the problem is to ensure the camera
    is at the top of the device when taking a landscape photo. That will
    avoid the "upside down" issue. Portrait photos will still need to be
    rotated 90 degrees by recipients who use Windows or software which
    doesn't support the orientation tag.

    Same rules apply to the iPhone - landscape with camera at the top is the
    "natural" orientation of the sensor.

    How do non-Apple tablets and smartphones deal with photo rotation?

    > > Windows XP and QuickTime 7 not supporting the Orientation tag are
    > > understandable given the age of their code base and only getting
    > > security fixes, but what is Microsoft's excuse for not supporting it in
    > > Windows 7?

    >
    > there isn't any.


    The plot thickens. After doing some more research it appears iOS may
    have started using the EXIF orientation tag to rotate photos with iOS 4
    (mid 2010, release of iPhone 4). Therefore widespread use of the
    orientation tag as a means of rotating photos may be newer than the
    introduction of Windows 7.

    Still doesn't excuse the lack of support in the subsequent updates of
    Windows 7.

    --
    David Empson
     
    David Empson, Jun 7, 2012
    #13
  14. Brian

    Brian Guest

    David Empson <> wrote:
    > nospam <> wrote:
    >
    >> In article <1klbjjd.18mjflx171uy6nN%>, David
    >> Empson <> wrote:
    >>
    >>> Judging from a quick Google search, the Orientation tag has existed
    >>> since 2002 or earlier. Heavy usage might not have started until the
    >>> iPhone and other smartphones had cameras and accelerometers, which is
    >>> circa mid 2007. I expect many digital cameras are using it now.

    >>
    >> most digital cameras had orientation sensors and were writing the tag
    >> by mid-2000s.
    >>
    >> photoshop & lightroom do the right thing and have for quite a while
    >> (lightroom since 1.0 but it's a newer product).

    >
    > Given the evidence, nothing outside Photoshop and other photo
    > editing/processing software would have been paying attention to the
    > orientation tag back then.
    >
    > The key problem is e-mailing photos directly from an iOS device. If 90%
    > of the potential recipients will get an incorrectly oriented photo,
    > blaming the recipient for their faulty software is not helpful, and
    > requiring them to rotate the photo doesn't seem all that good either.
    >
    > An app on the iOS device to physically rotate the photo (and adjust the
    > orientation tag) seems the best option. There is an iPhone App "Rotate
    > Mailer" which claims to do the right thing, but I haven't tried it.
    >
    > Otherwise the easiest way to avoid the problem is to ensure the camera
    > is at the top of the device when taking a landscape photo. That will
    > avoid the "upside down" issue. Portrait photos will still need to be
    > rotated 90 degrees by recipients who use Windows or software which
    > doesn't support the orientation tag.
    >
    > Same rules apply to the iPhone - landscape with camera at the top is the
    > "natural" orientation of the sensor.
    >
    > How do non-Apple tablets and smartphones deal with photo rotation?
    >
    >>> Windows XP and QuickTime 7 not supporting the Orientation tag are
    >>> understandable given the age of their code base and only getting
    >>> security fixes, but what is Microsoft's excuse for not supporting it in
    >>> Windows 7?

    >>
    >> there isn't any.

    >
    > The plot thickens. After doing some more research it appears iOS may
    > have started using the EXIF orientation tag to rotate photos with iOS 4
    > (mid 2010, release of iPhone 4). Therefore widespread use of the
    > orientation tag as a means of rotating photos may be newer than the
    > introduction of Windows 7.
    >
    > Still doesn't excuse the lack of support in the subsequent updates of
    > Windows 7.


    This makes me think that it is impossible to take a up side down photo on
    purpose using the iPad.

    --
    Regards Brian
     
    Brian, Jun 7, 2012
    #14
  15. Brian

    Brian Guest

    My Name Is Tzu How Do You Do <> wrote:
    > On Wed, 06 Jun 2012 09:04:57 -0700, nospam <> wrote:
    >
    >> In article <>,
    >> Brian <> wrote:
    >>
    >>> I took a photo using the back camera on the iPad using the camera app that
    >>> came with the iPad. I e-mailed it to a friend from the iPad. My friend said
    >>> that the photo I e-mailed him is upside down. What went wrong?

    >>
    >> his software is ignoring the orientation tag.
    >>
    >> he needs to update whatever software he's using or use something else
    >> that does.

    >
    >
    > Why not have the app that takes it and sets it that way OFFER the user
    > an option to flip it at creation/save time. Godfdamned AppleTards
    > foisting a 'norm' again that is NOT normal.
    >
    > I mean bass ackwards is bass ackwards.
    >
    > Having the prompt to flip the tag should be the norm, since the picture
    > as saved, is not (normal). Failing to update the software to include
    > either full exif edit session capacity or a simple switch for this
    > debacle (yes, it IS) should be forthcoming forthwith!
    >
    > But NOOOOOOOooooooooo...


    It was saved where the photos are saved on the iPad then I had an option to
    send it by e-mail so maybe the iPad does not send the exif information.


    --
    Regards Brian
     
    Brian, Jun 7, 2012
    #15
  16. Brian

    News Guest

    On 6/7/2012 7:36 AM, My Name Is Tzu How Do You Do wrote:
    > On Wed, 06 Jun 2012 09:04:57 -0700, nospam<> wrote:
    >
    >> In article<>,
    >> Brian<> wrote:
    >>
    >>> I took a photo using the back camera on the iPad using the camera app that
    >>> came with the iPad. I e-mailed it to a friend from the iPad. My friend said
    >>> that the photo I e-mailed him is upside down. What went wrong?

    >>
    >> his software is ignoring the orientation tag.
    >>
    >> he needs to update whatever software he's using or use something else
    >> that does.

    >
    >
    > Why not have the app that takes it and sets it that way OFFER the user
    > an option to flip it at creation/save time. Godfdamned AppleTards
    > foisting a 'norm' again that is NOT normal.
    >
    > I mean bass ackwards is bass ackwards.
    >
    > Having the prompt to flip the tag should be the norm, since the picture
    > as saved, is not (normal). Failing to update the software to include
    > either full exif edit session capacity or a simple switch for this
    > debacle (yes, it IS) should be forthcoming forthwith!
    >
    > But NOOOOOOOooooooooo...



    How intuitive, how crAAPL.
     
    News, Jun 7, 2012
    #16
  17. Brian

    George Kerby Guest

    On 6/7/12 8:39 AM, in article jqqauo$jm$, "News"
    <> wrote:

    > On 6/7/2012 7:36 AM, My Name Is Tzu How Do You Do wrote:
    >> On Wed, 06 Jun 2012 09:04:57 -0700, nospam<> wrote:
    >>
    >>> In article<>,
    >>> Brian<> wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> I took a photo using the back camera on the iPad using the camera app that
    >>>> came with the iPad. I e-mailed it to a friend from the iPad. My friend said
    >>>> that the photo I e-mailed him is upside down. What went wrong?
    >>>
    >>> his software is ignoring the orientation tag.
    >>>
    >>> he needs to update whatever software he's using or use something else
    >>> that does.

    >>
    >>
    >> Why not have the app that takes it and sets it that way OFFER the user
    >> an option to flip it at creation/save time. Godfdamned AppleTards
    >> foisting a 'norm' again that is NOT normal.
    >>
    >> I mean bass ackwards is bass ackwards.
    >>
    >> Having the prompt to flip the tag should be the norm, since the picture
    >> as saved, is not (normal). Failing to update the software to include
    >> either full exif edit session capacity or a simple switch for this
    >> debacle (yes, it IS) should be forthcoming forthwith!
    >>
    >> But NOOOOOOOooooooooo...

    >
    >
    > How intuitive, how crAAPL.


    Jealous much there, BOY?
     
    George Kerby, Jun 7, 2012
    #17
  18. Brian

    News Guest

    On 6/7/2012 9:46 AM, George Kerby wrote:
    >
    >
    >
    > On 6/7/12 8:39 AM, in article jqqauo$jm$, "News"
    > <> wrote:
    >
    >> On 6/7/2012 7:36 AM, My Name Is Tzu How Do You Do wrote:
    >>> On Wed, 06 Jun 2012 09:04:57 -0700, nospam<> wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> In article<>,
    >>>> Brian<> wrote:
    >>>>
    >>>>> I took a photo using the back camera on the iPad using the camera app that
    >>>>> came with the iPad. I e-mailed it to a friend from the iPad. My friend said
    >>>>> that the photo I e-mailed him is upside down. What went wrong?
    >>>>
    >>>> his software is ignoring the orientation tag.
    >>>>
    >>>> he needs to update whatever software he's using or use something else
    >>>> that does.
    >>>
    >>>
    >>> Why not have the app that takes it and sets it that way OFFER the user
    >>> an option to flip it at creation/save time. Godfdamned AppleTards
    >>> foisting a 'norm' again that is NOT normal.
    >>>
    >>> I mean bass ackwards is bass ackwards.
    >>>
    >>> Having the prompt to flip the tag should be the norm, since the picture
    >>> as saved, is not (normal). Failing to update the software to include
    >>> either full exif edit session capacity or a simple switch for this
    >>> debacle (yes, it IS) should be forthcoming forthwith!
    >>>
    >>> But NOOOOOOOooooooooo...

    >>
    >>
    >> How intuitive, how crAAPL.

    >
    > Jealous much there, BOY?
    >


    Nope, asshat.
     
    News, Jun 7, 2012
    #18
  19. Brian

    David Empson Guest

    Brian <> wrote:

    > My Name Is Tzu How Do You Do <> wrote:
    > > On Wed, 06 Jun 2012 09:04:57 -0700, nospam <> wrote:
    > >
    > >> In article <>,
    > >> Brian <> wrote:
    > >>
    > >>> I took a photo using the back camera on the iPad using the camera app
    > >>> that came with the iPad. I e-mailed it to a friend from the iPad. My
    > >>> friend said that the photo I e-mailed him is upside down. What went
    > >>> wrong?
    > >>
    > >> his software is ignoring the orientation tag.
    > >>
    > >> he needs to update whatever software he's using or use something else
    > >> that does.

    > >
    > >
    > > Why not have the app that takes it and sets it that way OFFER the user
    > > an option to flip it at creation/save time. Godfdamned AppleTards
    > > foisting a 'norm' again that is NOT normal.
    > >
    > > I mean bass ackwards is bass ackwards.
    > >
    > > Having the prompt to flip the tag should be the norm, since the picture
    > > as saved, is not (normal). Failing to update the software to include
    > > either full exif edit session capacity or a simple switch for this
    > > debacle (yes, it IS) should be forthcoming forthwith!
    > >
    > > But NOOOOOOOooooooooo...

    >
    > It was saved where the photos are saved on the iPad then I had an option to
    > send it by e-mail so maybe the iPad does not send the exif information.


    The EXIF data is buried inside the JPEG at the time the photo is taken,
    and it includes an Orientation tag. (I've tested this using my iPad, and
    my iPhone for comparison.)

    The first half of the problem is that standard software on Windows, plus
    common third party web browsers and e-mail clients on both Windows and
    Mac (I haven't checked Linux) completely ignore the Orientation tag,
    despite it being a defined part of EXIF and having been in use for
    several years on a variety of devices (assuming nospam is right about
    the timing of it being used by digital cameras).

    The second half of the problem is that as of iOS 4 (mid 2010), Apple
    decided to rely on the EXIF Orientation tag to rotate photos, rather
    than phyisically rotating the image when creating the JPEG. This seems
    an odd decision given almost nonexistent support for EXIF Orientation on
    Windows. Apple's main reason for doing this was probably to save
    processing time and power consumption in the iOS device. This method has
    continued to be used in iOS 5.

    Since the affected applications ignore the Orientation tag, they show
    the photo in the physical orientation it occurs in the JPEG, which for
    an iPad or iPhone corresponds to the landscape orientation with the
    camera at the top of the image.

    If you were holding the iPad or iPhone in landscape with the camera at
    the bottom, then the photo saved by the iPad or iPhone is physically
    upside down, with an Orientation tag instructing the viewing software to
    rotate it 180 degrees. If the viewing software doesn't pay attention to
    the Orientation tag, then it will display the photo upside down.

    If you have access to a Mac which is running Apple's standard Mail
    client and with Firefox installed, it is easy to test this. E-mail
    yourself a photo taken "upside down" with the iPad. Mail will show the
    photo up the right way. Now save the attached JPEG image, and
    drag-and-drop it to Firefox. Firefox will show the picture upside down.
    This is because Firefox is ignoring the Orientation tag, while Mail is
    recognising it.

    Alternatively, if you have access to both a Mac and Windows PC, e-mail
    the same photo to both computers, and observe that the Mac has the photo
    up the right way (because Mail understands the Orientation tag) while
    the Windows PC has it upside down (because its e-mail client doesn't
    understand the Orientation tag).

    --
    David Empson
     
    David Empson, Jun 7, 2012
    #19
  20. Brian

    David Empson Guest

    David Empson <> wrote:

    > nospam <> wrote:
    >
    > > In article <1klbjjd.18mjflx171uy6nN%>, David
    > > Empson <> wrote:


    [...]

    > > > Windows XP and QuickTime 7 not supporting the Orientation tag are
    > > > understandable given the age of their code base and only getting
    > > > security fixes, but what is Microsoft's excuse for not supporting it in
    > > > Windows 7?

    > >
    > > there isn't any.

    >
    > The plot thickens. After doing some more research it appears iOS may
    > have started using the EXIF orientation tag to rotate photos with iOS 4
    > (mid 2010, release of iPhone 4). Therefore widespread use of the
    > orientation tag as a means of rotating photos may be newer than the
    > introduction of Windows 7.
    >
    > Still doesn't excuse the lack of support in the subsequent updates of
    > Windows 7.


    Footnote: I've seen a comment that Windows 8 implements the Orientation
    tag, but haven't confirmed this myself.

    That's a start. Now, how about Microsoft porting it back to Windows 7 in
    the next service pack?

    Definitely no hope for XP (nor for Vista, but it is hardly worth
    worrying about as XP and Win 7 are much more common).

    --
    David Empson
     
    David Empson, Jun 7, 2012
    #20
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