Process Killer app

Discussion in 'iPhone' started by Gary, Jan 8, 2012.

  1. Gary

    Gary Guest

    Does anyone know what this app actually does? I downloaded it and
    killed all running process (except 2), but when I then went to the
    multitasking screen (press home twice), the apps that were supposed to
    have been killed were still there. So what is the app doing?
     
    Gary, Jan 8, 2012
    #1
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  2. In article <4f09b3f0$0$20331$c3e8da3$>,
    Gary <> wrote:

    > Does anyone know what this app actually does? I downloaded it and
    > killed all running process (except 2), but when I then went to the
    > multitasking screen (press home twice), the apps that were supposed to
    > have been killed were still there. So what is the app doing?


    That screen shows recently opened apps; they are not necessarily running.
    Read this article to understand what's happening:

    <http://www.macworld.com/article/164616/2012/01/how_ios_multitasking_really_
    works.html>

    --
    Tea Party Patriots is to Patriotism as
    People's Democratic Republic is to Democracy.
     
    Michelle Steiner, Jan 8, 2012
    #2
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  3. Gary

    Ed Cryer Guest

    Michelle Steiner wrote:
    > In article<4f09b3f0$0$20331$c3e8da3$>,
    > Gary<> wrote:
    >
    >> Does anyone know what this app actually does? I downloaded it and
    >> killed all running process (except 2), but when I then went to the
    >> multitasking screen (press home twice), the apps that were supposed to
    >> have been killed were still there. So what is the app doing?

    >
    > That screen shows recently opened apps; they are not necessarily running.
    > Read this article to understand what's happening:
    >
    > <http://www.macworld.com/article/164616/2012/01/how_ios_multitasking_really_
    > works.html>
    >


    I've monitored and examined this process using the System app. And I've
    come to the conclusion that iOS has a big problem with memory
    allocation. It's the Suspended state of memory-hogging that causes the
    problem. What iOS does is use as much RAM as it can, and only clear out
    when it needs space.

    In the System app, look at the memory usage diagram, clear the
    white-marked area, see available RAM grow.

    You can try my proven method as a test. Run as normal until it takes
    some time to give the click-off sound after pressing the button; about a
    second or so delay. Reboot, run a program, press off button and get the
    click-off sound immediately.

    I now reboot daily.


    Ed
     
    Ed Cryer, Jan 8, 2012
    #3
  4. Gary

    Ed Cryer Guest

    Jolly Roger wrote:
    > In article<jecfhd$87d$>,
    > Ed Cryer<> wrote:
    >
    >> Michelle Steiner wrote:
    >>> In article<4f09b3f0$0$20331$c3e8da3$>,
    >>> Gary<> wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> Does anyone know what this app actually does? I downloaded it and
    >>>> killed all running process (except 2), but when I then went to the
    >>>> multitasking screen (press home twice), the apps that were supposed to
    >>>> have been killed were still there. So what is the app doing?
    >>>
    >>> That screen shows recently opened apps; they are not necessarily running.
    >>> Read this article to understand what's happening:
    >>>
    >>> <http://www.macworld.com/article/164616/2012/01/how_ios_multitasking_really_
    >>> works.html>

    >>
    >> I've monitored and examined this process using the System app. And I've
    >> come to the conclusion that iOS has a big problem with memory
    >> allocation. It's the Suspended state of memory-hogging that causes the
    >> problem. What iOS does is use as much RAM as it can, and only clear out
    >> when it needs space.

    >
    > What you just described is how most Unix operating systems work today.
    >
    >> In the System app, look at the memory usage diagram, clear the
    >> white-marked area, see available RAM grow.

    >
    > What "System" application are you talking about?
    >
    >> You can try my proven method as a test. Run as normal until it takes
    >> some time to give the click-off sound after pressing the button; about a
    >> second or so delay. Reboot, run a program, press off button and get the
    >> click-off sound immediately.

    >
    > I don't recall ever seeing a significant delay on my iPhone 4. As soon
    > as I press the sleep button, the screen goes dark.
    >
    >> I now reboot daily.

    >
    > That seems like a really silly thing to do, but whatever floats your
    > boat.
    >


    Don't be stupid, birdbrain.

    Ed
     
    Ed Cryer, Jan 8, 2012
    #4
  5. Gary

    Alan Browne Guest

    On 2012-01-08 10:40 , Michelle Steiner wrote:
    > In article<4f09b3f0$0$20331$c3e8da3$>,
    > Gary<> wrote:
    >
    >> Does anyone know what this app actually does? I downloaded it and
    >> killed all running process (except 2), but when I then went to the
    >> multitasking screen (press home twice), the apps that were supposed to
    >> have been killed were still there. So what is the app doing?

    >
    > That screen shows recently opened apps; they are not necessarily running.
    > Read this article to understand what's happening:
    >
    > <http://www.macworld.com/article/164616/2012/01/how_ios_multitasking_really_
    > works.html>


    Good article. Thanks.

    It would be nice if (eg.):

    -Running apps that are in background were highlighted with a green
    square around them.

    -Foreground, but inactive, highlighted with a yellow square around them.

    -Suspended/resident - not running, orange square.

    Symbol/color could be different, just putting up the notion that it
    should be easily identifiable.

    --
    "We demand rigidly defined areas of doubt and uncertainty."
    Douglas Adams - (Could have been a GPS engineer).
     
    Alan Browne, Jan 9, 2012
    #5
  6. Gary

    Tom Stiller Guest

    In article <>,
    Alan Browne <> wrote:

    > On 2012-01-08 10:40 , Michelle Steiner wrote:
    > > In article<4f09b3f0$0$20331$c3e8da3$>,
    > > Gary<> wrote:
    > >
    > >> Does anyone know what this app actually does? I downloaded it and
    > >> killed all running process (except 2), but when I then went to the
    > >> multitasking screen (press home twice), the apps that were supposed to
    > >> have been killed were still there. So what is the app doing?

    > >
    > > That screen shows recently opened apps; they are not necessarily running.
    > > Read this article to understand what's happening:
    > >
    > > <http://www.macworld.com/article/164616/2012/01/how_ios_multitasking_really_
    > > works.html>

    >
    > Good article. Thanks.
    >
    > It would be nice if (eg.):
    >
    > -Running apps that are in background were highlighted with a green
    > square around them.
    >
    > -Foreground, but inactive, highlighted with a yellow square around them.
    >
    > -Suspended/resident - not running, orange square.
    >
    > Symbol/color could be different, just putting up the notion that it
    > should be easily identifiable.


    What would you do differently if you had that information?

    --
    PRAY, v. To ask that the laws of the universe be annulled in behalf
    of a single petitioner confessedly unworthy. -- Ambrose Bierce
     
    Tom Stiller, Jan 9, 2012
    #6
  7. In article <>,
    Alan Browne <> wrote:

    > It would be nice if (eg.):
    >
    > -Running apps that are in background were highlighted with a green
    > square around them.
    >
    > -Foreground, but inactive, highlighted with a yellow square around them.


    Since only one app can be in the foreground, it's active. And is not shown
    in the recent-apps bar.

    I doubt that there are enough people interested in this for it to be worth
    Apple's time, and if Apple did do it, they would have a devil of a time
    explaining what it means to the average user.

    -- Michelle

    --
    Tea Party Patriots is to Patriotism as
    People's Democratic Republic is to Democracy.
     
    Michelle Steiner, Jan 9, 2012
    #7
  8. In article <jed4cp$cmi$>, Ed Cryer <>
    wrote:

    > > That seems like a really silly thing to do, but whatever floats your
    > > boat.

    >
    > Don't be stupid, birdbrain.


    "whatever floats your boat" means essentially, do what you want; it won't
    hurt anything. So he's stupid and a birdbrain for saying that?

    I note that you didn't answer his question about what "System" app you're
    talking about.

    --
    Tea Party Patriots is to Patriotism as
    People's Democratic Republic is to Democracy.
     
    Michelle Steiner, Jan 9, 2012
    #8
  9. Gary

    Wes Groleau Guest

    On 01-08-2012 11:14, Ed Cryer wrote:
    > I now reboot daily.


    I reboot when it acts up. Maybe once a week. And I think that's the
    fault of certain apps, not of IOS.

    --
    Wes Groleau

    You always have time for what you do first.
     
    Wes Groleau, Jan 9, 2012
    #9
  10. Gary

    Guest

    On Sun, 8 Jan 2012 10:19:12 -0500, Gary <> wrote:

    >Does anyone know what this app actually does? I downloaded it and
    >killed all running process (except 2), but when I then went to the
    >multitasking screen (press home twice), the apps that were supposed to
    >have been killed were still there. So what is the app doing?


    The app is shutting all but two down. The multiple icons you
    see when you double click are just shortcuts to apps that are
    no longer running.
     
    , Jan 9, 2012
    #10
  11. Gary

    Ed Cryer Guest

    Michelle Steiner wrote:
    > In article<jed4cp$cmi$>, Ed Cryer<>
    > wrote:
    >
    >>> That seems like a really silly thing to do, but whatever floats your
    >>> boat.

    >>
    >> Don't be stupid, birdbrain.

    >
    > "whatever floats your boat" means essentially, do what you want; it won't
    > hurt anything. So he's stupid and a birdbrain for saying that?
    >
    > I note that you didn't answer his question about what "System" app you're
    > talking about.
    >


    His whole attitude is subjective, brusque and dismissive. Look at what
    he says about the OS & memory allocation; about his experience with his
    iPhone; about my daily rebooting. He seems utterly incapable of
    objective discussion that might reach beyond his own limited experience.
    People like that are a pain in the neck; they tend to just brush so much
    under the carpet.

    You yourself are very pro-iEverything; maybe not a bad thing in itself,
    but it won't endear you to people having problems. And remember that
    general purpose PCs have a very varied usage amongst different people.
    That's why so many manufacturers do beta-testing across the world before
    releasing software.

    Ed
     
    Ed Cryer, Jan 9, 2012
    #11
  12. In article <jefe3e$502$>, Ed Cryer <>
    wrote:

    > You yourself are very pro-iEverything;


    No, I'm not. I do, however, have a realistic view of what is right and
    what is wrong with iOS and Mac OS systems and hardware, and more
    importantly, what is important overall, and what isn't.

    > And remember that general purpose PCs have a very varied usage amongst
    > different people.


    Yup, and iOS devices are not general-purpose PCs.

    Oh, and you still haven't said what that "System" app is.

    --
    Tea Party Patriots is to Patriotism as
    People's Democratic Republic is to Democracy.
     
    Michelle Steiner, Jan 9, 2012
    #12
  13. Gary

    salgud Guest

    On Mon, 09 Jan 2012 07:42:51 -0600, Jolly Roger wrote:

    >
    > *plonk*


    All this time, I've been trying to get you to killfile me, and you kill him
    on his first appearance! Doesn't seem fair. :(
     
    salgud, Jan 9, 2012
    #13
  14. In article <5gw056ahzeam$>,
    salgud <> wrote:

    > All this time, I've been trying to get you to killfile me, and you kill
    > him on his first appearance! Doesn't seem fair. :(


    The reason you don't get killfiled is that you want to get kill filed.

    --
    Tea Party Patriots is to Patriotism as
    People's Democratic Republic is to Democracy.
     
    Michelle Steiner, Jan 9, 2012
    #14
  15. Gary

    Alan Browne Guest

    On 2012-01-08 21:28 , Tom Stiller wrote:
    > In article<>,
    > Alan Browne<> wrote:


    >> It would be nice if (eg.):
    >>
    >> -Running apps that are in background were highlighted with a green
    >> square around them.
    >>
    >> -Foreground, but inactive, highlighted with a yellow square around them.
    >>
    >> -Suspended/resident - not running, orange square.
    >>
    >> Symbol/color could be different, just putting up the notion that it
    >> should be easily identifiable.

    >
    > What would you do differently if you had that information?


    I'm sometimes uncertain which apps are running in BG. One of them, for
    example is GPS Kit. If you're recording a track and you click the home
    button, it backgrounds and keeps recording for [iirc] 30 minutes. If I
    want to stop that I can click the app and double-home-click to stop the app.

    With the above suggestion (color boxes) there could also be action
    gestures to stop|dispose of the app. (back-swipe, for example).

    --
    "We demand rigidly defined areas of doubt and uncertainty."
    Douglas Adams - (Could have been a GPS engineer).
     
    Alan Browne, Jan 9, 2012
    #15
  16. Gary

    Alan Browne Guest

    On 2012-01-08 22:21 , Michelle Steiner wrote:
    > In article<>,
    > Alan Browne<> wrote:
    >
    >> It would be nice if (eg.):
    >>
    >> -Running apps that are in background were highlighted with a green
    >> square around them.
    >>
    >> -Foreground, but inactive, highlighted with a yellow square around them.

    >
    > Since only one app can be in the foreground, it's active. And is not shown
    > in the recent-apps bar.


    Definitions I guess. To me the music player is a foreground app even if
    something else (map, browser, whatever) is "visually" in the foreground
    and responding to gestures.

    That may be wrong in the iPhone context.

    > I doubt that there are enough people interested in this for it to be worth
    > Apple's time, and if Apple did do it, they would have a devil of a time
    > explaining what it means to the average user.


    You explain that apps that are running in BG use more battery juice.
    People will then decide if it's worth juice for that apps BG contribution.

    Explanations don't have to be technical, just cause and effect.

    --
    "We demand rigidly defined areas of doubt and uncertainty."
    Douglas Adams - (Could have been a GPS engineer).
     
    Alan Browne, Jan 9, 2012
    #16
  17. Gary

    Ed Cryer Guest

    Michelle Steiner wrote:
    > In article<jefe3e$502$>, Ed Cryer<>
    > wrote:
    >
    >> You yourself are very pro-iEverything;

    >
    > No, I'm not. I do, however, have a realistic view of what is right and
    > what is wrong with iOS and Mac OS systems and hardware, and more
    > importantly, what is important overall, and what isn't.
    >
    >> And remember that general purpose PCs have a very varied usage amongst
    >> different people.

    >
    > Yup, and iOS devices are not general-purpose PCs.
    >
    > Oh, and you still haven't said what that "System" app is.
    >


    It's an app I got to analyse system events in iPad1. It works well.

    Apple should have made available something similar; also some filestore
    analysis app. But they didn't, so we're reduced to having to do it for
    ourselves.

    Let's not bicker about terminology in "general-purpose PC". The iPad has
    RAM, hard disk, OS and lots of apps. It is for all the world a portable
    PC. And very pleased to have one I am. I still love it, but it's losing
    its initial magic with time.

    Ed
     
    Ed Cryer, Jan 9, 2012
    #17
  18. Gary

    Tom Stiller Guest

    In article <>,
    Alan Browne <> wrote:

    > On 2012-01-08 21:28 , Tom Stiller wrote:
    > > In article<>,
    > > Alan Browne<> wrote:

    >
    > >> It would be nice if (eg.):
    > >>
    > >> -Running apps that are in background were highlighted with a green
    > >> square around them.
    > >>
    > >> -Foreground, but inactive, highlighted with a yellow square around them.
    > >>
    > >> -Suspended/resident - not running, orange square.
    > >>
    > >> Symbol/color could be different, just putting up the notion that it
    > >> should be easily identifiable.

    > >
    > > What would you do differently if you had that information?

    >
    > I'm sometimes uncertain which apps are running in BG. One of them, for
    > example is GPS Kit. If you're recording a track and you click the home
    > button, it backgrounds and keeps recording for [iirc] 30 minutes. If I
    > want to stop that I can click the app and double-home-click to stop the app.
    >
    > With the above suggestion (color boxes) there could also be action
    > gestures to stop|dispose of the app. (back-swipe, for example).


    Seems like needless bother to me. In an app can run in the background
    and I'm interested in its generated results (e.g. location services) I'd
    let it run. Otherwise I'd kill it off.

    --
    PRAY, v. To ask that the laws of the universe be annulled in behalf
    of a single petitioner confessedly unworthy. -- Ambrose Bierce
     
    Tom Stiller, Jan 9, 2012
    #18
  19. In article <jefgfr$kul$>, Ed Cryer <>
    wrote:

    > > Oh, and you still haven't said what that "System" app is.
    > >

    >
    > It's an app I got to analyse system events in iPad1. It works well.


    Got where? From the App Store, or did you have to jailbreak the iPad?

    > Apple should have made available something similar; also some filestore
    > analysis app. But they didn't, so we're reduced to having to do it for
    > ourselves.


    Why should Apple have made available something that a very minuscule
    portion of iPad owners would ever use?

    > Let's not bicker about terminology in "general-purpose PC". The iPad has
    > RAM, hard disk, OS and lots of apps. It is for all the world a portable
    > PC.


    Portable, yes; general purpose, no. It is not designed to be a
    general-purpose PC.

    --
    Tea Party Patriots is to Patriotism as
    People's Democratic Republic is to Democracy.
     
    Michelle Steiner, Jan 9, 2012
    #19
  20. In article <>,
    Alan Browne <> wrote:

    > > Since only one app can be in the foreground, it's active. And is not shown
    > > in the recent-apps bar.

    >
    > Definitions I guess. To me the music player is a foreground app even if
    > something else (map, browser, whatever) is "visually" in the foreground
    > and responding to gestures.


    By definition, only one app at a time can be a foreground app.

    --
    Tea Party Patriots is to Patriotism as
    People's Democratic Republic is to Democracy.
     
    Michelle Steiner, Jan 9, 2012
    #20
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