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[SOLVED] Charging iPod and iPhone in 220V environment

 
 
Gary
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      Oct 13th, 09, 3:44 AM
I have a Kensington charger which can plug into foreign outlets and has
USB output.
It is supposed to be able to charge iPod and iPhone, but I'm
suspicious. It's not a transformer; it doesn't change voltages. It's
only a plug adapter.
If I use it on a trip to a country which offers only 220 volt power,
will I potentially damage my electronics units?

Thanks in advance for your suggestions.

 
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Mike
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      Oct 13th, 09, 7:30 AM
Malcolm wrote:
> On 2009-10-12 22:44:37 -0400, Gary <(E-Mail Removed)> said:
>
>> I have a Kensington charger which can plug into foreign outlets and
>> has USB output.
>> It is supposed to be able to charge iPod and iPhone, but I'm
>> suspicious. It's not a transformer; it doesn't change voltages. It's
>> only a plug adapter.
>> If I use it on a trip to a country which offers only 220 volt power,
>> will I potentially damage my electronics units?
>>
>> Thanks in advance for your suggestions.

>
> The Apple charger will work from 100-240 Volts, so all it needs is a
> plug adapter. Any charger should have its voltage range printed on it
> (in very fine print in Apple's case).
>


I use the apple wall charger to charge anything that charges from a USB
including other phones, Sat Nav and even AA/AAA batteries via an adaptor.

I doubt very much that the Kensington charger outputs 220v as the OP
believes, Kensington seem far too sensible for that! Not only would it
ruin any USB device plugged in but potentially lethal.


Mike
 
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Gilles Kohl
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      Oct 13th, 09, 7:40 AM
Gary,

On Mon, 12 Oct 2009 22:44:37 -0400, Gary <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:

>I have a Kensington charger which can plug into foreign outlets and has
>USB output.
>It is supposed to be able to charge iPod and iPhone, but I'm
>suspicious. It's not a transformer; it doesn't change voltages. It's
>only a plug adapter.


If it has USB output, I'd say it's a transformer - USB is specified at
5 Volts IIRC.

>If I use it on a trip to a country which offers only 220 volt power,
>will I potentially damage my electronics units?


Check the underside of the unit for "small print" - what does it say
there? My Apple iPhone adapter says

Input: 100-240V~, 50-60Hz

Output: 5V === 1A

That means that it can handle a mains AC voltage between 100 and 240
Volts, 50 (e.g. Europe) to 60 (e.g. US) cycles/sec, and will output a
DC current of 5 Volts and provide a max of 1000 mA current to the
connected device.

The Apple charger is also only a plug (and a pretty small one,
especially the US version) but it includes a transformer - I'm pretty
sure your Kensington device does so too. If it states similar specs
(watch for both the 100-240V and the 50-60Hz ranges, especially), and
has a USB socket where you can plug your iPod/iPhone cable in, you
should be fine. I'd say the charger should be able to provide at least
500 mA (0.5A) of current.

Note that if you have your laptop (and its AC adapter, ahem) with you,
you can also charge your iPhone using one of its USB sockets.

Regards,
Gilles.



 
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Harald Hanche-Olsen
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      Oct 13th, 09, 3:20 PM
+ Gilles Kohl <(E-Mail Removed)>:

> If it has USB output, I'd say it's a transformer - USB is specified at
> 5 Volts IIRC.


More likely a switched-mode power supply, I think.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Switched-mode_power_supply

--
* Harald Hanche-Olsen <URL:http://www.math.ntnu.no/~hanche/>
- It is undesirable to believe a proposition
when there is no ground whatsoever for supposing it is true.
-- Bertrand Russell
 
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Dennis Reinhardt
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      Oct 13th, 09, 3:24 PM
Gilles Kohl schrieb:

> Input: 100-240V~, 50-60Hz
>
> Output: 5V === 1A


Heh, I have a car-usb-charger from a GPS-mouse and wondered why my HTC
TouchPro wasn't charged... then I looked on that sticker and found a
"Output: 5V = 5mA" Far away from the 500mA that the phone needs to
charge properly.

 
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Paul Fuchs
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      Oct 13th, 09, 3:45 PM
Mike <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:

> Malcolm wrote:
> > On 2009-10-12 22:44:37 -0400, Gary <(E-Mail Removed)> said:
> >
> >> I have a Kensington charger which can plug into foreign outlets and
> >> has USB output.
> >> It is supposed to be able to charge iPod and iPhone, but I'm
> >> suspicious. It's not a transformer; it doesn't change voltages. It's
> >> only a plug adapter.
> >> If I use it on a trip to a country which offers only 220 volt power,
> >> will I potentially damage my electronics units?
> >>
> >> Thanks in advance for your suggestions.

> >
> > The Apple charger will work from 100-240 Volts, so all it needs is a
> > plug adapter. Any charger should have its voltage range printed on it
> > (in very fine print in Apple's case).
> >

>
> I use the apple wall charger to charge anything that charges from a USB
> including other phones, Sat Nav and even AA/AAA batteries via an adaptor.
>
> I doubt very much that the Kensington charger outputs 220v as the OP
> believes, Kensington seem far too sensible for that! Not only would it
> ruin any USB device plugged in but potentially lethal.
>
>
> Mike


Gary sounds confused. He says it's not a voltage transformer, only a
plug adaptor, but it has a USB jack output. Never heard of a plug
adapter with a USB out port. This would mean that it would pump at
least 120 volts into the USB port which is absurd. It is abviously a
charger which converts the current to 5v DC that can be used by an
iPhone. Apple, and most other chargers, can use either 115v or 230v,
but not all. I had an old Palm with a Spanish dictionary on it which I
wanted to use in 230v country about a year ago (before buying my
iTouch), and after a careful scrutiny, discovered that the Palm charger
was not rated above 115v. I always carry a wall wart transformer with
me anyway, which I bought on eBay for about $6 plus postage. It is
about two inches cubed and rated for 50 watts. Kicks the voltage down
by one half.
--
Never believe anything until it's officially denied.
 
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Adrian C
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      Oct 13th, 09, 10:38 PM
Paul Fuchs wrote:
I always carry a wall wart transformer with
> me anyway, which I bought on eBay for about $6 plus postage. It is
> about two inches cubed and rated for 50 watts. Kicks the voltage down
> by one half.


Good idea. Unfortunately some US-market adaptors, even though they may
have printed notes on supporting 230V areas (and numerous overseas
certifications), will have been built down to a cost - and vital
components skipped (or replaced with lesser types) on the PCB.

Might be OK for short term use plugged into the European mains as here,
but in the long term (unless it's a big make that would stand behind
their products worldwide as I'd expect Apple to) it would be better to
source an additional supply in the overseas country. Or use that
transformer.

--
Adrian C
 
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